::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Territory and Jurisdiction” by Adnan A. Zulfiqar

By Adnan A. Zulfiqar This post is part of the Roundtable on the History of Islamic International Law.  It is a summary of Adnan A. Zulfiqar's contribution titled "Territory and Jurisdiction" to volume eight of the Cambridge History of International Law series, co-edited by Intisar Rabb and Umut Özsu. This essay explores features of territory … Continue reading ::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Territory and Jurisdiction” by Adnan A. Zulfiqar

A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

By Omar Farahat It is common knowledge that substantive Islamic laws are constituted of juristic pronouncements (aḥkām) on a wide range of actions, abstentions, and their possible consequences. Internally, we might say, these pronouncements of the jurists assume a sense of authority given their relation to divine revelation. The pronouncements or rulings of the jurists … Continue reading A Duty to Obey Muslim Jurists?

Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the third in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. In late 2010, a Tunisian fruit seller, frustrated by restrictions on his ability to make a living and constant police harassment, poured gasoline on himself and lit a match. This was largely viewed as the … Continue reading Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

Collective Duties (farḍ kifāya) in Islamic Law

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the first in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. Among the most significant challenges in studying or teaching Islamic law is situating it within its proper normative framework. Unfortunately, an account of Islamic law’s historical growth and development is often considered sufficient for understanding … Continue reading Collective Duties (farḍ kifāya) in Islamic Law