Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS While attention has been paid to Iran‘s morality police due to the recent protests there, scholars have also written about how the institution of the morality police manifests itself in jurisdictions other than Iran. “In a two-one majority ruling today, the Court of Appeal [of Malaysia] reversed a High Court’s previous declaration that a 37-year-old… CONTINUE READING

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In “Iran Isn’t the Only Country With Morality Police” (Council on Foreign Relations (January 11, 2023)), Kali Robinson (Council on Foreign Relations) writes that it is not only Iran, but that “[m]ultiple countries have special police that enforce Islamic moral codes.” In “Islamic Economics: Comparisons” (Annual Review of Islamic Finance (January 5, 2023)), Belal Ehsan… CONTINUE READING

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS “Describing the ban on Afghan women working for foreign organisations as ‘perplexing,’ the [Organization of Islamic Cooperation] called on [the Taliban government] ‘to revisit this decision for the sake of social inclusion of women and the undisrupted continuation of the much-needed international humanitarian safety net in Afghanistan.'” For more content and context on the recent… CONTINUE READING

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In “The Probate Regime: Enchanted Bureaucracy, Islamic Law, and the Capital of Orphans in Nineteenth-Century Egypt” (Law and History Review (2022)), Adam Mestyan (Duke University) and Rezk Nori (Center for Contemporary History of Egypt) “explore the ‘probate regime,’ an administrative field of government activity of legally transferring, taxing, and administering bequests” and how it manifested… CONTINUE READING

Why I No Longer Use the Term “Qāḍī-Court Documents”

By Marina Rustow I came into my graduate seminar on Arabic legal documents with some experience in paleography and diplomatics, but vanishingly little knowledge of the material I was going to be teaching. I knew I wouldn’t always, or even often, have answers about how to read the sources, let alone how the judicial system … Continue reading Why I No Longer Use the Term “Qāḍī-Court Documents”

Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

By Marina Rustow Legal documents have survived from the medieval Islamic world in considerable quantity, but the mystery of their quotidian production and use abides. The mystery concerns personnel and physical location: Who wrote documents, and where? Where did witnesses sign them? To what extent were judges involved in their production and handling? Over the … Continue reading Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS “Women in Afghanistan carried out a protest against the Taliban-led regime after they banned women from working for Non-Government Organisations (NGOs).” “Even before the Taliban barred Afghan women from working at non-governmental groups, their forces visited the office of one local organization in the capital Kabul several times to check female staff were obeying rules… CONTINUE READING

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In “The ICC and Traditional Islamic Legal Scholarship: Analysing the War Crimes Against Civilians” (in International Criminal Law: A Counter-Hegemonic Project, 2022), Fajri Matahati Muhammadin (Universitas Gadjah Mada) and Ahmad Sadzali (Universitas Islam Indonesia) argue that “if Islamic law has prescribed criminalization for international crimes up to a standard which is at least on par… CONTINUE READING

Welcome to our January Guest Blogger: Marina Rustow

I am a social historian of the medieval Middle East, and I work with a relatively neglected type of source: documents, especially sources from the Cairo Geniza, a cache of roughly 400,000 folio pages and fragments preserved in an Egyptian synagogue. I also work with Arabic papyri and paper documents from other sources. Most of … Continue reading Welcome to our January Guest Blogger: Marina Rustow

Thank you, Iza Hussin!

Thank you, Iza Hussin for joining us as guest blog editor in December. In case you missed her blog posts, here they are: Introduction: How to do things with translation How to do things with translation: ‘Law’ in the Malay world How to do things with translation: ‘Religion’ How to do things with translation: ‘Personal … Continue reading Thank you, Iza Hussin!