Islamic Law & History at the Middle East Studies Association Conference (2021): Session Roundup

The 2021 Middle East Studies Association (MESA) Annual Meeting is taking place on November 29 - December 5, 2021.  A complete program listing all the various sessions can be found here, and registration details can be accessed here. The Islamic Law Blog has curated below a list of panels relating to Islamic law and history … Continue reading Islamic Law & History at the Middle East Studies Association Conference (2021): Session Roundup

Thank you, Issam Eido!

Thank you, Issam Eido, for joining us as guest blog editor in November. In case you missed Prof. Eido's essays on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law, here they are: Lived or Non-Lived Ḥadīth? Content vs. Narrator Criteria in Early Ḥanafī Law Early Ḥanafī Jurists, Court Practice, and … Continue reading Thank you, Issam Eido!

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Muslim cryptocurrency enthusiasts in Indonesia have found a way around the recent fatwā issued by the nation's Ulama Council, ruling that cryptocurrency is forbidden under to Islamic law. The Bangladesh House Building Finance Corporation (BHBFC) stated that it has started sharī'a-based financing in the housing sector. The Taliban's implementation of … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Implementation of International Human Rights in Pakistan: Finding a Balance between Western Conceptions and Islamic Law" (Manchester Journal of Transnational Islamic Law & Practice 17, no. 1 (2021)), Sana Khan argues that Pakistan's relative failure to implement human rights standards it has adopted in its constitution and through several … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Tools for Interpreting Ḥadīth in Shaybānī’s Ḥujja

By Issam Eido This is part four in a series of four posts on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law. Kitāb al-Ḥujja ʿalā Ahl al-Madīna is one of several books attributed to the judge Muḥammad ibn al-Ḥasan al-Shaybānī.[1] Early Ḥanafī biographical dictionaries used to classify early Ḥanafī … Continue reading Tools for Interpreting Ḥadīth in Shaybānī’s Ḥujja

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad issued a decree that expanded the jurisdiction of Syria's Council of Islamic Jurisprudence. According to a recently-issued decree, civil marriage by non-Muslims have now been allowed in Abu Dhabi. Financial experts have urged Muslim countries to "develop common regulatory, financial, and religious frameworks to capitalize on … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Why taking action on climate change is an Islamic obligation" (Wisconsin Muslim Journal, November 16, 2021), editors of the Wisconsin Muslim Journal argue that "the possibility of environmental protection can also be covered by the Islamic concept of jihad, especially for individual Muslims and Muslim organizations." In "Al-Shāfiʿī Against the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Canons: Specific and General aṣl

By Issam Eido This is part three in a series of four posts on Ḥanafī criteria for using ḥadīth in the ‘courts and canons’ of early Islamic law. Before the emergence of the canonical ḥadīth books, courts served as one of the main factors in the formative period in impacting the concept of fiqh and … Continue reading Canons: Specific and General aṣl

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS In an opinion piece for Insider, Hafsa Lodi made the case for "Islamic feminism," stating that Islam "profoundly improved the status and legal rights of women in 7th Century Arabia, and the Prophet Muhammad was Islam's 'first feminist.'" Sana Khan, a former Indian actress, explained to journalists her recent efforts … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Why we need to reform sharia—now" (Prospect, November 1, 2021), Mustafa Akyol (Cato Institute) argues that the Taliban's return to power "calls for an honest discussion about how to divorce Islamic law from coercive power." In Oceanic Islam: Muslim Universalism and European Imperialism (Bloomsbury Publishing, 2020), Sugata Bose (Harvard … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup