Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Indo-Islamic Cultural Foundation's futuristic design of the new Ayodha Mosque, planned to be built on the site of the Babri Masjid that was demolished in 1992, sparked debate in the country. An amendment to Saudi Arabia's harassment law that will enable the "naming and shaming" of convicted offenders was approved by the country's cabinet.

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

On January 7-8, 2021, the Legal History Blog hosted an online conference entitled "Paper Empires: Layers of law in colonial South Asia and the Indian Ocean." Among others, Fahad Bishara (University of Virginia) presented his paper entitled "The Sailing Scribes: Legal Thinking and Praxis Across the Twentieth-Century Indian Ocean." In "The Majelis Ulama Indonesia and … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

President of the Jamiat Ulama-e-Hind and Principal of Darul Uloom Deoband, Arshad Madani, among the leading Islamic scholars in India, stated that the COVID-19 vaccine is permissible under Islamic law. Raza Academy in India, an organization of Sufi Muslims, wrote to the World Health Organization, requesting information about the contents of the various vaccines against … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

By Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University in Qatar) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Iran issued the first set of ID cards to children born to Iranian mothers and foreign fathers. In India the first arrest was made based on the newly-enacted Interfaith Marriage Law that aims to stop the so-called "love jihād" - a term highly contested and often invoked by Hindu nationalists to accuse Muslim men of … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Hum Do Hamare Do* and Sharī’a in India

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. * A common Hindi slogan indicating the desirability of a married couple limiting their progeny to two. Source Summary In Javed & Ors. v. … Continue reading Hum Do Hamare Do* and Sharī’a in India

PIL Fellow Sohaib Baig Wins Best Dissertation Prize!

The Program in Islamic Law (PIL) is pleased to announce that Sohaib Baig, PIL fellow, won the Thomas E. Lifka Dissertation Prize for the best dissertation in the Department of History at UCLA. Baig's dissertation is titled “Indian Hanafis in an Ocean of Hadith: Islamic Legal Authority between South Asia and the Arabian Peninsula, 16th … Continue reading PIL Fellow Sohaib Baig Wins Best Dissertation Prize!

The Danial Latifi Case: Shah Bano Redux

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Source Summary In Danial Latifi & Anr v. Union of India, the Supreme Court of India (the “Court”) considers whether the Muslim Women Protection … Continue reading The Danial Latifi Case: Shah Bano Redux

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Sudan’s bishops celebrated Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok’s declaration officially forbidding the state from establishing a religion, which had been Islam prior to the declaration. While some Muslims in Malaysia called for making it mandatory for women to wear the ḥijāb (or the tudung, as it is called in Malaysia), Maryam Lee, a prominent human … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: Khursheed Ahmad Khan v. State of U.P. is a recent Indian Supreme Court case. Khursheed Ahmad Khan (appellant), a Muslim civil servant, married … Continue reading The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law