Islamic Law in the News Roundup

This Ramadan, because the duration of the fast varies from city to city based on dawn-to-dust time,  the Russian city of Murmansk has the longest fasting time - a total of 18 hours. Standard Bank announced that it launched its first shar'īa discretionary trust offering. Legal experts from the UAE recently stated that a person … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

On April 12, Pakistani forces arrested Saad Rizvi, the head of the recently outlawed Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan (TLP), who called for civil disobedience unless the French ambassador is expelled - a reaction against what he considered blasphemous depictions of the Prophet in French media outlets. An Egyptian Ramadan TV series, Al Tawoos (literally, peacock), is investigated … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A California Court of Appeals refused to apply Iranian law in a case involving a plaintiff whose work in Iran exposed him to high levels of asbestos, reasoning that Iranian law reflects religious ideology instead of economic interest. The All India Muslim Personal Law Board issued a statement urging Muslims in India to adhere to Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Halal Guys filed suit against the Halal Girls, accusing the competing ḥalāl restaurant of trademark infringement. Four alleged white supremacists who are accused of anti-Muslim violence, among other charges, can face charges based on the Anti-Riot Act of 1968, a federal appeals court ruled. Iran's Expediency Council, tasked with settling disagreements between the parliament … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "International Law in General in the Medieval Islamic World" (The Cambridge History of International Law, Volume VIII: International Law in the Islamic World, Part I: International Law in the Medieval Islamic World (622-1453) (forthcoming)) Mohammad Fadel (University of Toronto) "provides the reader with an introduction to basic questions of Islamic international law as they … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Hum Do Hamare Do* and Sharī’a in India

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. * A common Hindi slogan indicating the desirability of a married couple limiting their progeny to two. Source Summary In Javed & Ors. v. … Continue reading Hum Do Hamare Do* and Sharī’a in India

Islam and Data Science Roundup

Salma Waheedi’s (Harvard Law School) and Musawah’s teams have put together an interactive project mapping recent developments in the family laws of thirty-one Muslim-majority countries. Titled “Mapping of Muslim Family Laws Globally,” the project seeks to document progress in family law and practice across Muslim nations with an additional focus on the extent to which … Continue reading Islam and Data Science Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Sharī‘a and Surrogacy in Pakistan

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Source Summary: In Farooq Siddiqui v. Mst. Farzana Naheed,[1] the Federal Shariat Court of Pakistan (“the Court”)[2] considers whether surrogacy can be reconciled with … Continue reading Sharī‘a and Surrogacy in Pakistan