Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Civil Law Principles in Fiqh of Islamic Law" (Tematics Journal of Law 14, no. 12 (December 2020)), Ayub Mukhammadiev (The Military-Technical Institute of the National Guard of the Republic of Uzbekistan) provides a brief overview of some general principles of Islamic law. In "Re-Assessing the Evidentiary Threshold for Zinā’ in Islamic Criminal Law: A … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Prisons, Abolition and Islamic Legal Discourse

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the fourth and last in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. Over the past several years, there has been a surge of interest in anti-carceral ideas in the United States arising out of greater public awareness of systemic problems in its criminal system. This … Continue reading Prisons, Abolition and Islamic Legal Discourse

New debates about the use and abuse of Islamic criminal law in Afghanistan

The NYT reports on a radical figure in Afghanistan who uses what mainstream scholars of Islamic law around him call novel and excessively harsh interpretations of Islamic criminal law or “sharī'a” to dole out punishments and gain support from locals who incorrectly think these harsh interpretations have religious or historical precedent. This same figure also … Continue reading New debates about the use and abuse of Islamic criminal law in Afghanistan

Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Summary In 1988, the Supreme Court of Malaysia heard the case of Che Omar bin Che Soh v. Public Prosecutor.1 The case arose as … Continue reading Capital Punishment Case Establishes that Sharia Cannot Invalidate Secular Laws in Malaysia

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

This Thursday, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) unanimously held that Greece owed a Greek woman by the name of Molla Sali 51,000 euros ($57,000) in damages plus expenses “for siding with her late husband’s two sisters and for applying ‘Sharia law to a section of its citizens against their wishes.’” This judgment follows a 2018 decision by the same court in Molla … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Interpreting Sharī’a in Amina Lawal v. State

By Limeng Sun This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Case Summary: This blog post examines Amina Lawal v. State, a criminal case adjudicated by the Sharī‘a Court of Appeal of Katsina State, Nigeria.[1] … Continue reading Interpreting Sharī’a in Amina Lawal v. State

Commentary :: Arbitrariness and the Burden of Proof in New Acehnese Cases of “Moral Crimes”

This post, by Waskito Jati, examines the litigation process and sentencing regime for a new type of moral crime in Aceh: khalwat (when an unmarried man and woman are secluded). This act is criminalized under the new Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law (Aceh Qanun Jinayat No. 6 of 2014). The classification of khalwat as a moral crime … Continue reading Commentary :: Arbitrariness and the Burden of Proof in New Acehnese Cases of “Moral Crimes”

Does ISIS Really Follow the Salafī Version of Islamic Law and Theology?

Guest contributor Jacob Olidort critically examines ISIS's claim of adherence to the doctrine of Salafism, a popular orientation among conservative Muslim clerics who attempt to model their actions on a certain vision of law and theology in the early Muslim community. Himself a scholar of modern Salafī thought, Olidort concludes that ISIS's claims are at … Continue reading Does ISIS Really Follow the Salafī Version of Islamic Law and Theology?

The Construction and Failure of Islamic Laws of Evidence in ISIS’s State-Building Project

Guest contributor Mara Revkin outlines the legal infrastructure of ISIS. She argues that the movement's barbarism and apparently wanton acts of terrorism belies a self-contained legal system based on Islamic law – including the Islamic law of evidence. Using interviews with eighty-two Syrians and Iraqis, Revkin reconstructs how evidence is used within ISIS's purported borders. … Continue reading The Construction and Failure of Islamic Laws of Evidence in ISIS’s State-Building Project