Islamic Law in the News Roundup

This Thursday, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) unanimously held that Greece owed a Greek woman by the name of Molla Sali 51,000 euros ($57,000) in damages plus expenses “for siding with her late husband’s two sisters and for applying ‘Sharia law to a section of its citizens against their wishes.’” This judgment follows a 2018 decision by the same court in Molla … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 4 :: The Art and Science of Keeping the Peace

This is part 4 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 4 :: The Art and Science of Keeping the Peace Students of Ḥanafī law learn that the crime of murder consists in a deliberate act, aiming at ending a life, by a competent adult, using—and this is where the emphasis is—a proper murder … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 4 :: The Art and Science of Keeping the Peace

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 3 :: After the Failure

This is part 3 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 3 :: An Islamic “Law-and-Economics” Jurisprudence Can one suggest the presence (latent or real) of a law-and-economics version of Islamic criminal law? The diya doctrine of financial restitution for injury has features that invite this consideration.  Diya applies, not only to whole human … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 3 :: After the Failure

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 2 :: In Government, Society and Jurist We (Need to) Trust

 This is part 2 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 2 :: In Government, Society and Jurist We (Need to) Trust In this post, I hope to achieve two goals.  First, I want to eliminate any attachment to the notion that punishment in Islamic criminal law is mainly corporeal punishment.  As I provide … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 2 :: In Government, Society and Jurist We (Need to) Trust

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure

This is part 1 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 1 :: After the Failure You are the kind of legal scholar who has no patience for trying tactics that lead into predictable problems. You take for granted that criminal acts (as reflection of a criminal capacity) are simply part of human nature, … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure

Interpreting Sharī’a in Amina Lawal v. State

By Limeng Sun This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Case Summary: This blog post examines Amina Lawal v. State, a criminal case adjudicated by the Sharī‘a Court of Appeal of Katsina State, Nigeria.[1] … Continue reading Interpreting Sharī’a in Amina Lawal v. State

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Islamic Criminal Jurisprudence on the Offence of Trafficking in Persons: An Interpretation of Fasad fil Arz and Hadd Offence," Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal, Muhammad Sohail and Ataullah Khan Mahmood address the topic of Hudood offences and their relationship to Islamic criminal jurisprudence. Raad Mozib Lalon reveals the economic effects … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Recent Scholarship: Akande on British Islamic Criminal Law in Northern Nigeria

"Secularizing Islam: The Colonial Encounter and the Making of a British Islamic Criminal Law in Northern Nigeria, 1903–58" by Rabiat Akande. This article narrates the ways in which siyasa, understood as "discretionary powers of political rulers," facilitated the making of a British Colonial Islamic law. Here, Akande focuses on criminal law in order to highlight what set … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Akande on British Islamic Criminal Law in Northern Nigeria

Recent Scholarship: Islamic Criminal Law Conference

During last month's conference at the University of Tehran on "Criminal Law Development in Muslim-Majority Countries," Paul H. Robinson delivered the opening and closing remarks. His remarks were recently published in Penn Law School's Public Law & Legal Theory Research Paper Series: "Codifying a Sharia-based Criminal Law in Developing Muslim Countries" The opening remarks discuss … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Islamic Criminal Law Conference