Islamic Law in the News Roundup

This Ramadan, because the duration of the fast varies from city to city based on dawn-to-dust time,  the Russian city of Murmansk has the longest fasting time - a total of 18 hours. Standard Bank announced that it launched its first shar'īa discretionary trust offering. Legal experts from the UAE recently stated that a person … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Halal Guys filed suit against the Halal Girls, accusing the competing ḥalāl restaurant of trademark infringement. Four alleged white supremacists who are accused of anti-Muslim violence, among other charges, can face charges based on the Anti-Riot Act of 1968, a federal appeals court ruled. Iran's Expediency Council, tasked with settling disagreements between the parliament … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Research on Islamic corporate social responsibility and Islamic bank disclosures" (Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment, 2021) Ardi Gunardi (Universitas Pasundan) and colleagues examine the corporate social responsibility disclosures made in the Islamic banking and finance sector, with a focus on board structure, ownership structure, CEO power, and what they term "shariah governance." Challenging … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Supreme Court of India recently declined to stay several controversial, so-called "anti-love jihād" laws passed by some states that are designed to prevent "forcible conversions" through marriage. Three member organizations of the French Council of Muslim Worship (CFCM) objected to the Charter of Principles of Islam that reaffirms the compatibility of Islam with the … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Quoted in an article appearing in the Wall Street Journal titled "Vienna Shooting Suspect Had Previous Terrorism Conviction," past Program in Islamic Law fellow and professor of Islamic law at Vienna University Ebrahim Afsah takes issue with state interventions across Europe to "stop the spread of Islamism." Afsah contends that European states create counterproductive results … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Michael Goodyear's (University of Michigan Law School) "Heaven or Earth: The Hagia Sophia Re-Conversion, Turkish and International Law, and Universal Religious Sites" (UCLA Journal of Islamic Law and Near Eastern Law (2021) (forthcoming)) takes a closer look at the recent Turkish court decision that enabled the reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque. While … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Iran’s Guardian Council recently stated that women are allowed to register as presidential candidates, although so far no woman has been approved by the Council. The French President Emanuel Macron’s recent statement describing Islam as “a religion that is in crisis all over the world today” and his government’s draft bill to be announced later … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: In November 2009, Switzerland passed a popular initiative prohibiting the construction of minarets. In response, Mr. Ouardiri, a Muslim living in Switzerland, challenged … Continue reading A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Polymorphous Discrimination: Rohingya Women in the Goggles of Intersectionality," Islamic Law and the Muslim World eJournal, Shadrack Bentil and Edmund Poku Adu analyze the plight of Rohingya women in the Rakhine State in Myanmar using intersectionality theory, in order to identify the grounds on which Rohingya women are methodically discriminated. The paper reveals multi-faceted structural discrimination … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Commentary :: Organic Labeling: Reconciling Religious Freedom and Animal Welfare in the European Union

Introduction On February 2019, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) issued an opinion mandating the stunning of an animal before slaughter to satisfy the EU organic labeling.[1] The decision came after several European countries including Denmark, Belgium, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, and Slovenia, removed any religious exemption for animal slaughter without stunning.[2] While this ECJ ruling does … Continue reading Commentary :: Organic Labeling: Reconciling Religious Freedom and Animal Welfare in the European Union