Islam and Data Science Roundup

In “Are Christians More Likely to Invoke RFRA--and win--than Other Religions since Hobby Lobby?” (Mercer Law Review, forthcoming), Stephen Cranney (Baylor University) investigates the assumption that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is successfully invoked by Christians rather than other religious minorities. Using a dataset consisting of post-Hobby Lobby cases invoking RFRA, Cranney finds that … Continue reading Islam and Data Science Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In “Are Christians More Likely to Invoke RFRA--and win--than Other Religions since Hobby Lobby?” (Mercer Law Review, forthcoming), Stephen Cranney (Baylor University) investigates the assumption that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is successfully invoked by Christians rather than other religious minorities. Using a dataset consisting of post-Hobby Lobby cases invoking RFRA, Cranney finds that … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

New debates about Islam in Europe

Talib Shareef, Yaya J. Fanusie, and Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, three African American Muslims with experience in a diverse array of American institutions, including the US Air Force, the CIA, and the Department of Homeland Security, respectively, recently wrote an article in Foreign Policy.  There, the authors cite and evaluate the existing narratives in circulation on Islam … Continue reading New debates about Islam in Europe

Professor Mohammad Fadel on Muslims, Islam, and Bostock

Professor Mohammad Fadel, senior editor at SHARIAsource, explores Muslim perspectives on religious freedom pertaining to the Supreme Court's recent Bostock v. Clayton County (2020) decision on equal protection in  "Professor Mohammad Fadel on Muslims, Islam, and Bostock". In this article, Fadel addresses disputes regarding the stances of some Muslims toward the rights of LGBTQ persons, … Continue reading Professor Mohammad Fadel on Muslims, Islam, and Bostock

Talāq, Sex Equality, and Due Process

By Limeng Sun This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Case Summary: The Maryland Court of Appeals, the state’s highest court, in a case of first impression, held that the enforcement of a talāq … Continue reading Talāq, Sex Equality, and Due Process

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "A Secular Need: Islamic Law and State Governance in Contemporary India," The University of Washington Press, Jeffrey A. Redding explores India’s non-state system of Muslim dispute resolution—known as the dar-ul-qaza system and commonly referred to as “Muslim courts” or “sharīʿa courts”—challenges conventional narratives about the inevitable opposition between Islamic law and secular forms of governance, … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Dubai suspends marriage and divorce proceedings during coronavirus lockdown. Indonesia experiences restrictions on hand sanitizer choices limited by halal restrictions. Qatari university professor shares insights on how to address pandemics from religious and ethical perspectives. Islamic university Darul Uloom Deoband asks Muslims to abide by governmental restrictions, invoking their interpretation of sharīʿa and its guidance on pandemics. Jordanian Ministry of Awqaf and Islamic … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. All roundups can be found at this link. Religious communities use digital tools, such as Zoom, to host services, lead … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Registration Open :: Political Theology Network Conference

"Political Theology” covers a multidisciplinary field of research that engages the unwieldy relationship between religion and politics out of a desire for justice. At the Political Theology Network Conference, we extend this engagement by bringing together scholars, activists, artists, and religious leaders working both inside and outside the academy. This year’s conference will take place … Continue reading Registration Open :: Political Theology Network Conference

Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: May 13th

Asifa Quraishi-Landes, who teaches both Islamic law and U.S. constitutional law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, was recently interviewed by Wisconsin Public Television on how the media can play a role in correcting misperceptions of Islamic law (the interview can be watched here). Meanwhile, Anver Emon, director of the Institute of Islamic Studies at the … Continue reading Islamic Law Scholars’ Round-Up: May 13th