Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "A Secular Need: Islamic Law and State Governance in Contemporary India," The University of Washington Press, Jeffrey A. Redding explores India’s non-state system of Muslim dispute resolution—known as the dar-ul-qaza system and commonly referred to as “Muslim courts” or “sharīʿa courts”—challenges conventional narratives about the inevitable opposition between Islamic law and secular forms of governance, … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Dubai suspends marriage and divorce proceedings during coronavirus lockdown. Indonesia experiences restrictions on hand sanitizer choices limited by halal restrictions. Qatari university professor shares insights on how to address pandemics from religious and ethical perspectives. Islamic university Darul Uloom Deoband asks Muslims to abide by governmental restrictions, invoking their interpretation of sharīʿa and its guidance on pandemics. Jordanian Ministry of Awqaf and Islamic … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. All roundups can be found at this link. Religious communities use digital tools, such as Zoom, to host services, lead … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

In the News: Indonesia’s Ḥalāl Labeling Law

  Last month, the Indonesian government decided to postpone an October 2019 deadline requiring all consumer goods sold in the country to be certified ḥalāl. According to a 2014 Indonesian law, all food, beverages, drugs, cosmetics, chemical, biological, and genetically engineered products, as well as “consumer goods that are worn, used, or utilized by the … Continue reading In the News: Indonesia’s Ḥalāl Labeling Law

In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

Two weeks ago, the European Court of Justice—the EU’s highest court—ruled that meat derived from animals that were not stunned before being slaughtered could not be labeled “organic.” The Court explained that the “organic” label was developed in response to consumers’ demand for food that protected animals’ welfare, and that scientific studies have shown that … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

In the News: Ḥalāl Food

A few weeks ago, Germany's Interior Ministry apologized after serving pork at a conference on Islam in Berlin. Most of the attendees at the conference were apparently Muslim, and under Islamic law, pork is not considered permissible (ḥalāl) to eat. Like other aspects of Islamic law, there are some differences among Islamic legal scholars (and … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Food

Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Cloyd v. Dulin (M.D. Tenn. 2012): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Plaintiff Sturgeon Stewart, an inmate at the Kansas Department of Corrections (KDOC) brought suit against Respondents Vernestene Dulin, head of prison food services, and various other prison officials for alleged violations of his rights to religious free exercise on the claim that the prison served Muslim inmates the same ḥalāl food menu for all meals of … Continue reading Islamic Law in U.S. Courts: Cloyd v. Dulin (M.D. Tenn. 2012): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Watts v. Byars (D.S.C. 2013): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

The Plaintiff, Marcus Leeotis Watts, sued the Respondents, various prison officials at the Perry Correctional Institution in South Carolina, for allegedly violating his rights under RLUIPA and the First Amendment when the prison failed to provide Muslim prisoners with ḥalāl meat. The Respondents contended that the vegetarian meal option that complied with Islamic law was adequate, … Continue reading Watts v. Byars (D.S.C. 2013): Religious Accommodations for Prisoners

Does a Muslim Inmate Have a First Amendment Right to a Halal Meal?

U.S. editor Abed Awad contextualizes a recent case in which a Muslim inmate filed suit against an American prison for failing to provide a halal meal. On August 17, 2016, the American Civil Liberties Union, on behalf of a Muslim inmate, filed suit against Boone County Sheriff. Gannon Thomas v. Boon County Sheriff, No. 1:16-cv-2189. Gannon Thomas … Continue reading Does a Muslim Inmate Have a First Amendment Right to a Halal Meal?