A Sultan Becomes Caliph: Legal Knowledge and Late Mamlūk Political Thought

By Christian Mauder This is part four in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. The governing elite of what is known as the Mamlūk Sultanate is often depicted as decidedly uninterested in notions of Islamic political thought and good governance. Robert Irwin sums up this traditional view of … Continue reading A Sultan Becomes Caliph: Legal Knowledge and Late Mamlūk Political Thought

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Ikhtilāf al-Fuqahāʾ as a Genre” by Professor Anas Sarmini

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Professor Anas Sarmini entitled “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Ikhtilāf al-Fuqahāʾ as a Genre" delivered on September 29, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Professor Sarmini offered September’s installation of the Islamic Legal Genres Workshop. … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Ikhtilāf al-Fuqahāʾ as a Genre” by Professor Anas Sarmini

Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

By Christian Mauder This is part two in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As former slave soldiers (mamlūks) of non-Muslim origin, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate did not acquire a natural familiarity with Islamic legal norms in their childhood and youth. Many … Continue reading Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

By Mehdi Berriah This is part three in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. In the cases presented in the sources discussed in the previous post, sultans and amīrs met, in general, with firm opposition on the part of several ʿulamāʾ to the imposition of additional taxes on … Continue reading The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

Resource Roundup: Afghanistan, the Taliban, and Islamic Law

The United States' withdrawal from Afghanistan, and the Taliban's subsequent takeover of the country has brought, once again, Islam and Islamic law to the fore in recent news coverage, reports, and analyses. This renewed attention to Islamic law is in part due to the fact that the Taliban identifies itself as a Muslim military organization … Continue reading Resource Roundup: Afghanistan, the Taliban, and Islamic Law

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Sijills and Transformations of Qāḍī Documents in Islamic Law” by Prof. Christian Mueller

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Prof. Christian Mueller entitled “Sijills and Transformations of Qāḍī Documents in Islamic Law” delivered at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Professor Müller offered this month what he himself termed as a reflection on Ottoman sijills “from the … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Sijills and Transformations of Qāḍī Documents in Islamic Law” by Prof. Christian Mueller

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Genre as a Tool for Understanding Islamic Law” by Prof. Ahmed al-Shamsy

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Prof. Ahmed El Shamsy entitled “What Kind of Gloss is a Ḥashiya?,” delivered on April 28, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Professor El Shamsy’s lecture described the history, impact, and receptions of legal ḥāshiya literature, … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Genre as a Tool for Understanding Islamic Law” by Prof. Ahmed al-Shamsy

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The new issue of the Journal of Islamic Law at Harvard Law School (Journal of Islamic Law 2, no. 1 (2021)) has been published online.  The new issue includes an article by Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University) entitled "Triple Divorce and the Political Context of Islamic Law in India" that discusses the recent enactment of an … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup