Documents of Sale as Living Objects

By Athina Pfeiffer Professor Marina Rustow's note: "Having been asked twice now to contribute to the ILB, I’ve been making my way into the corpus of Islamic notarial documents preserved in Cairo Geniza. In the hope of understanding them better, I taught a PhD seminar on them in Fall 2022. Two of my students, Amel … Continue reading Documents of Sale as Living Objects

Getting to know iqrārs

By Amel Bensalim Professor Marina Rustow's note: "Having been asked twice now to contribute to the ILB, I’ve been making my way into the corpus of Islamic notarial documents preserved in Cairo Geniza. In the hope of understanding them better, I taught a PhD seminar on them in Fall 2022. Two of my students, Amel … Continue reading Getting to know iqrārs

Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

By Marina Rustow Legal documents have survived from the medieval Islamic world in considerable quantity, but the mystery of their quotidian production and use abides. The mystery concerns personnel and physical location: Who wrote documents, and where? Where did witnesses sign them? To what extent were judges involved in their production and handling? Over the … Continue reading Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

How to do things with translation: Translation as archives of mobility

By Iza Hussin The opening pages of KPG7514.M35 1837,[1] the text that forms the subject of the first blog entry, and texts like it, have given scholars a better sense of how law was understood in the Malay world in its moment: Bahawa Ini Kitab Undang-Undang Qanun Yang Dipakai Dalam Negeri Johor, "this is the … Continue reading How to do things with translation: Translation as archives of mobility

How to do things with translation: ‘Law’ in the Malay world

By Iza Hussin Kitab Undang-Undang Qanun Yang Dipakai Dalam Negeri Johor, 1837 As last week's blog entry briefly introduced, these are the opening pages of KPG7514.M35 1837, a Malay text recently rediscovered at the Library of Congress.[1] The pencilled title on the facing page is in English and underlined: Malay Code of Laws, followed by … Continue reading How to do things with translation: ‘Law’ in the Malay world

Introduction: How to do things with translation

By Iza Hussin This series of guest blog posts explores avenues for considering translation as a problematic through which to engage Islamic law in global circulation. This Introduction,[1] and the four posts that follow, sketch out related but distinct ways in which translation matters for the circulation of sharī’a concepts and institutions. The first relates … Continue reading Introduction: How to do things with translation

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Ṭabaqāt al-Fuqahāʾ: What is a Genre?” by Professor Marion Katz

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Professor Marion Katz entitled “Ṭabaqāt al-Fuqahāʾ: What is a Genre?," delivered on October 27, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom.  The video recording of the lecture can be accessed here. Professor Marion Katz delivered October’s lecture … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Ṭabaqāt al-Fuqahāʾ: What is a Genre?” by Professor Marion Katz

Back to the Isnād: The Prophetization of the Sunna

By Mathieu Tillier This is part four in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. In the first three posts in this series on the historical formation of the Sunna, I have argued that it is possible to … Continue reading Back to the Isnād: The Prophetization of the Sunna

From Anonymous Dicta to the Prophet’s Sunna

By Mathieu Tillier This is part three in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. The history of Islamic law and that of ḥadīth are closely connected. As I recalled in my previous posts, prophetic authority as expressed … Continue reading From Anonymous Dicta to the Prophet’s Sunna

Imploring God and the “Living Tradition”: A Relative Chronology of Epigraphic and Traditional Invocations

By Mathieu Tillier This is part two in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. Stating that the sunna of the Prophet represents a major source of classical Islamic law may appear as self-evident. Many legal rulings are … Continue reading Imploring God and the “Living Tradition”: A Relative Chronology of Epigraphic and Traditional Invocations