Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Ṭabaqāt al-Fuqahāʾ: What is a Genre?” by Professor Marion Katz

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Professor Marion Katz entitled “Ṭabaqāt al-Fuqahāʾ: What is a Genre?," delivered on October 27, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom.  The video recording of the lecture can be accessed here. Professor Marion Katz delivered October’s lecture … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Ṭabaqāt al-Fuqahāʾ: What is a Genre?” by Professor Marion Katz

Back to the Isnād: The Prophetization of the Sunna

By Mathieu Tillier This is part four in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. In the first three posts in this series on the historical formation of the Sunna, I have argued that it is possible to … Continue reading Back to the Isnād: The Prophetization of the Sunna

From Anonymous Dicta to the Prophet’s Sunna

By Mathieu Tillier This is part three in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. The history of Islamic law and that of ḥadīth are closely connected. As I recalled in my previous posts, prophetic authority as expressed … Continue reading From Anonymous Dicta to the Prophet’s Sunna

Imploring God and the “Living Tradition”: A Relative Chronology of Epigraphic and Traditional Invocations

By Mathieu Tillier This is part two in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. Stating that the sunna of the Prophet represents a major source of classical Islamic law may appear as self-evident. Many legal rulings are … Continue reading Imploring God and the “Living Tradition”: A Relative Chronology of Epigraphic and Traditional Invocations

Early Fiqh and the Issue of Ḥadīth Dating

By Mathieu Tillier This is part one in a series of four posts on the historical formation of the Sunna, with a focus on methodological reflections on the emergence of Prophetic authority. Classical Islamic law hermeneutics relied on four well-known sources: the Qur’ān, the sunna, consensus, and analogy (qiyās). The first two represent textual sources … Continue reading Early Fiqh and the Issue of Ḥadīth Dating

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Ikhtilāf al-Fuqahāʾ as a Genre” by Professor Anas Sarmini

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Professor Anas Sarmini entitled “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Ikhtilāf al-Fuqahāʾ as a Genre" delivered on September 29, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom.  The video recording of the lecture can be accessed here. Professor … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Ikhtilāf al-Fuqahāʾ as a Genre” by Professor Anas Sarmini

Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

By Christian Mauder This is part two in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As former slave soldiers (mamlūks) of non-Muslim origin, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate did not acquire a natural familiarity with Islamic legal norms in their childhood and youth. Many … Continue reading Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part one in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. Many students of Islamic history are fascinated by the unusual polity that ruled Egypt, Syria, and neighboring regions from about 1250 to 1517 CE. This political entity was dominated by a small elite group … Continue reading Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

By Mehdi Berriah This is part three in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. In the cases presented in the sources discussed in the previous post, sultans and amīrs met, in general, with firm opposition on the part of several ʿulamāʾ to the imposition of additional taxes on … Continue reading The Sharīʿa on the Financing of Jihād

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Are the Limitations on Remedies Fair? A Comparative Study between the US Law and Islamic Law" (SSRN, May 18, 2021), Fahad Aldossary (Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law) discusses how US and Islamic laws situate and understand the legal concepts of "foreseeability, causation, mitigation, and certainty." In "Mapping The Common Law Concept … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup