Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Apostasy and Freedom of Religion in Malaysia," Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal, Joshua Neoh argues that the constitutional space for the freedom of religion in Malaysia is best carved out by drawing on constitutional law, international law and the common law. Heidi Gilchrist explores laws that criminalize dress in Europe … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

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Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan refuses to close mosques during Ramadan, despite pleas from doctors and a rising number of infections. In Sudan, hundreds of people perform Eid al-Fitr prayers in mosques and public squares, violating orders that prohibit gatherings and group prayers. Iran allows communal prayers at a select number of mosques and cancels … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

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Indonesia's Ulema Council issues a fatwā allowing Muslims to perform Eid al-Fitr prayers at home amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Indonesia's Chairman of the Fatwā Board, Hasanuddin, announces stipulations for Eid al-Fitr prayers, where there should be a congregation of at least four people, where one acts as an imam or the worship leader, and the … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

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Dubai suspends marriage and divorce proceedings during coronavirus lockdown. Indonesia experiences restrictions on hand sanitizer choices limited by halal restrictions. Qatari university professor shares insights on how to address pandemics from religious and ethical perspectives. Islamic university Darul Uloom Deoband asks Muslims to abide by governmental restrictions, invoking their interpretation of sharīʿa and its guidance on pandemics. Jordanian Ministry of Awqaf and Islamic … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

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Countries and communities around the world are working to contain COVID-19 and mitigate its effects. The following digest represents a variety of sources in which law, particularly Islamic law, was invoked in the decision making process. All roundups can be found at this link. Kuwait amends the adhan to urge prayer at home amidst mosque closures. … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Daniel Peterson discusses a 2013 decision of Indonesia’s Constitutional Court (Mahkamah Konstitusi) and a series of lower court judgments issued following that decision in "Case Note: Constitutional Court Decision No 93/PUU-X/2012 on Shari’a Banking Dispute Resolution," Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal (originally published in Australian Journal of Asian Law).

Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: September 6

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This week’s issue of SSRN’s Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal includes: "The Role of Indonesian Constitutional Court in Resolving Disputes Among the State Organs" by Khairil Azmin Mokhtar, International Islamic University Malaysia, Aberystwyth University, and Iwan Satriawan, Universitas Muhammadiyah Yogyakarta. This paper attempts to assess the role of the Constitutional Court of Indonesia in the process … Continue reading Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: September 6

In the News: Indonesia’s Ḥalāl Labeling Law

  Last month, the Indonesian government decided to postpone an October 2019 deadline requiring all consumer goods sold in the country to be certified ḥalāl. According to a 2014 Indonesian law, all food, beverages, drugs, cosmetics, chemical, biological, and genetically engineered products, as well as “consumer goods that are worn, used, or utilized by the … Continue reading In the News: Indonesia’s Ḥalāl Labeling Law

In the News: Islamic Burial Traditions

SHARIAsource Senior Scholar Mohammad Fadel recently wrote an article in the Middle East Eye reflecting on current events in Turkey and Saudi Arabia, and the historical significance of violating someone’s right to a proper burial. “In Islamic law,” Fadel explains, “burying the dead is a collective obligation—an obligation that falls on the entire community of … Continue reading In the News: Islamic Burial Traditions

In the News: Interfaith Marriages and Islamic Law in Tunisia

Last fall, Tunisia overturned a 1973 law that banned Muslim women from marrying non-Muslim men. (It is generally accepted by Islamic scholars that men are permitted to marry women of certain monotheistic faiths that predate Islam, such as Judaism and Christianity; however, the opposite scenario—Muslim women marrying non-Muslim men—is a source of contention.) Supporters of … Continue reading In the News: Interfaith Marriages and Islamic Law in Tunisia