COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Egypt's Dar al-Ifta recently issued a fatwā, announcing that the use of zakāh (almsgiving) funds to buy the coronavirus vaccine was permissible under Islamic law, as it served the higher objective of "preservation of the self." Hashem Ahmad Alshilleh, who helped to bury a generation of Muslims in Southern California in accordance with Islamic law, … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

As companies continue to develop vaccines against COVID-19, questions about whether these vaccines contain pork-derived ingredients continue to occupy the minds of many Muslims. Salman Waqar from the British Islamic Medical Association stated that "[t]he ḥalāl aspect of it [the Pfizer vaccine] has been noted by several scholars, from Sunnī and Shī'a backgrounds in the … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Following the beheading of Samuel Paty, a French teacher of civics, for showing caricatures of the Prophet in class during a discussion on French secularism or laicité, French teachers reported finding conversations around the issue to be increasingly difficult and volatile. Japanese Muslims expressed their frustration with the difficulty to find burial facilities and locations … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Criticism of French President Macron, who recently described Islam as “a religion in crisis” and vowed to pass legislation in the coming weeks to allow for greater government control over mosques and their clerics, continued, as some legal scholars have contended that his statements violated both the French Constitution and international law. Others have noted … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the third in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. In late 2010, a Tunisian fruit seller, frustrated by restrictions on his ability to make a living and constant police harassment, poured gasoline on himself and lit a match. This was largely viewed as the … Continue reading Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

A Tale of Two Contagions: Science, Imperialism, and the 1883 Cholera in Egypt

By Christopher Rose At Cairo, sanitary matters are nearly at a standstill; the executive administration cannot enforce their orders. On Saturday last, the bad feeling … nearly stirred up a rebellion, so that matters looked very serious. The Egyptian lower classes consider all precautions to be impious; “God is Great,” they cry, and all is … Continue reading A Tale of Two Contagions: Science, Imperialism, and the 1883 Cholera in Egypt