Islamic Law in the News Roundup

On April 12, Pakistani forces arrested Saad Rizvi, the head of the recently outlawed Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan (TLP), who called for civil disobedience unless the French ambassador is expelled - a reaction against what he considered blasphemous depictions of the Prophet in French media outlets. An Egyptian Ramadan TV series, Al Tawoos (literally, peacock), is investigated … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In Transformations of Tradition: Islamic Law in Colonial Modernity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Junaid Quadri (University of Illinois at Chicago), explores the various ways in which Islamic law was interpreted in innovative ways to accommodate new technologies and modernity, with a focus on a towering 20th century figure, Egyptian scholar Bakhit al-Muti'i, who all the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A California Court of Appeals refused to apply Iranian law in a case involving a plaintiff whose work in Iran exposed him to high levels of asbestos, reasoning that Iranian law reflects religious ideology instead of economic interest. The All India Muslim Personal Law Board issued a statement urging Muslims in India to adhere to Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Hajj and Umrah announced in a statement that only "immunized people" will be allowed to perform the umrah (year-round pilgrimage) and the hajj (pilgrimage). Egypt announced that only designated mosques will be open during Ramadan for the additional Ramadan prayer (ṣalāt al-tarāwīḥ), not to exceed half an hour.

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Halal Guys filed suit against the Halal Girls, accusing the competing ḥalāl restaurant of trademark infringement. Four alleged white supremacists who are accused of anti-Muslim violence, among other charges, can face charges based on the Anti-Riot Act of 1968, a federal appeals court ruled. Iran's Expediency Council, tasked with settling disagreements between the parliament … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Egypt's Dar al-Ifta recently issued a fatwā, announcing that the use of zakāh (almsgiving) funds to buy the coronavirus vaccine was permissible under Islamic law, as it served the higher objective of "preservation of the self." Hashem Ahmad Alshilleh, who helped to bury a generation of Muslims in Southern California in accordance with Islamic law, … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

As companies continue to develop vaccines against COVID-19, questions about whether these vaccines contain pork-derived ingredients continue to occupy the minds of many Muslims. Salman Waqar from the British Islamic Medical Association stated that "[t]he ḥalāl aspect of it [the Pfizer vaccine] has been noted by several scholars, from Sunnī and Shī'a backgrounds in the … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Following the beheading of Samuel Paty, a French teacher of civics, for showing caricatures of the Prophet in class during a discussion on French secularism or laicité, French teachers reported finding conversations around the issue to be increasingly difficult and volatile. Japanese Muslims expressed their frustration with the difficulty to find burial facilities and locations … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup