Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Sharī‘ah-Compliant Equities and Sharī‘ah Screening: Need for Convergence of Ethical Screening of Stocks with Sharī‘ah Screening"  (International Journal of Emerging Markets, forthcoming) Tauhidul Islam Tanin (Monash University) and Faruq Ahmad (Islamic Economics Institute) argue that Islamic finance must incorporate a method whereby "the ethical screening of stocks" is integrated into the screening process for … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Commentarial Ocean

By Mahmood Kooria The postclassical commentarial literature of Islamic law, once ignored for being repetitive and inauthentic, now has been receiving considerable scholarly attention. Through the processes of canonization, codification, regionalization, synthesis and transregional connections; forms such as core texts, commentaries, supercommentaries, autocommentaries, glosses, translations and summaries; and contents such as substantive laws, contextual selections … Continue reading Commentarial Ocean

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A California Court of Appeals refused to apply Iranian law in a case involving a plaintiff whose work in Iran exposed him to high levels of asbestos, reasoning that Iranian law reflects religious ideology instead of economic interest. The All India Muslim Personal Law Board issued a statement urging Muslims in India to adhere to Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A “Jabri” madhhab of the early modern Sudan?

By Kristina L. Richardson Given the centuries of exposure to northern African Islamic thought like Khārijism, Ibāḍism, and Mālikism, could sub-Saharan Muslims have established an indigenous, perhaps syncretic, Islamic legal school? 17th-century Ottoman explorer Evliya Çelebi claimed as much, though we may have to take his descriptions with a grain of salt. Between August 1672 … Continue reading A “Jabri” madhhab of the early modern Sudan?

Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

By Kristina L. Richardson For centuries the Sunnī Mālikī madhhab has predominated among Muslims of northern and western Africa, but before the 12th century, Shīʿī, Khārijī, and Ibāḍī legal schools vied for dominance.[1] Merchants living under the Ibāḍī Rustamids (779-909, capital in Tāhart) and in independent Khārijī states in the western Maghrib, such as the … Continue reading Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

Toni Morrison, John Ralph Willis, and Black Muslim History

By Kristina L. Richardson Allow me to share a factoid about Toni Morrison’s (1931-2019) little known connection to Islamic historians. She grew up in Lorain, Ohio, with her younger cousin John Ralph Willis (1938-2007), who carried the name of their grandfather, a violinist named John Solomon Willis. The cousins forged separate paths as adults, only … Continue reading Toni Morrison, John Ralph Willis, and Black Muslim History

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Vice President Maruf Amin of Indonesia confirmed President Joko Widodo’s view that COVID-19 vaccines should receive a ḥalāl certification to render their use permissible under Islamic law. Harvard University's Center for African Studies will host an online lecture on November 12, 2020, titled "Legal Regulation of Faith: The Limits of Religious Freedom and the Challenge … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

“700,000 Ancient African Books Have Survived In Mali’s Timbuktu University”

The following article was cross-posted from Liberty Writers Africa. "700,000 Ancient African Books Have Survived In Mali’s Timbuktu University" Not until recently did most commentators on African literary history believe that African societies had any form of writing tradition. Since the rediscovery of ancient manuscript collections, with some dating back to at least the 8th century … Continue reading “700,000 Ancient African Books Have Survived In Mali’s Timbuktu University”

Recent Scholarship: Fadel and Monette on the English Translation of the Muwatta’ of Imam Malik b. Anas

"Introduction to the English Translation of the Muwatta' of Imam Malik b. Anas, Recension of Yahya b. Yahya al-Laythi (Royal Moroccan Edition, 2013)," Mālik b. Anas, al-Muwaṭṭaʾ -- Recension of Yaḥyā b. Yaḥyā al-Laythī (d. 234/848), edited and translated by Mohammad Fadel, University of Toronto Faculty of Law, and Connell Monette, American Academy Casablanca. The Muwatta' of Malik b. Anas … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Fadel and Monette on the English Translation of the Muwatta’ of Imam Malik b. Anas

Recent Developments in Muslim Marriages and Civil Laws

Last summer, the Guardian reported on a legal proceeding in the United Kingdom that explored the extent to which UK law recognizes a marriage conducted according to Islamic law, yet unaccompanied by a civil law marriage. As described in the article, the husband contended that the couple was never married, and the wife—petitioning for divorce—insisted that they were. … Continue reading Recent Developments in Muslim Marriages and Civil Laws