Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS In her opinion piece in Rewire News Group, Aliza Kazmi, commenting on the recently leaked Supreme Court opinion that would overrule Roe v. Wade, wrote: "Islam supports an individual’s bodily autonomy, and we need to advocate for our community’s right to an abortion." Lawyers for the Malian Islamist rebel Al … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Legal Canons—In the Classroom and in the Courtroom or, Comparative Perspective on the Origins of Islamic Legal Canons, 1265–1519" (Villanova Law Review 66, no. 5 (2022)), Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief; Harvard University) traces the origins of Islamic law canons, with a focus on how those canons were utilized in Islamic … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Launched in 2017, Morocco's Moussalaha program has been increasingly impactful in helping those incarcerated for terrorism, including, among other things, by focusing on reading and interpreting the sacred texts. Egyptian officials announced that the country will be issuing its first sukuk bond by this June. A new report in the … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Navigating Colonial Law in a 'Sea of Islands'" (Law & Social Inquiry Online (December 3, 2021)), Renisa Mawani (University of British Columbia) reviews Nurfadzilah Yahaya's Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Laws and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). In "Rumi without Islam: the cultural appropriation of Rumi" (Bayt Al … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Abel Awad, an American lawyer and Islamic law expert, stated that the viability-based reasoning behind the famous U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, recognizing a woman's right to an abortion, imposed one religious view of viability on the American society while marginalizing other religions' view on viability, including that … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Sharī‘ah-Compliant Equities and Sharī‘ah Screening: Need for Convergence of Ethical Screening of Stocks with Sharī‘ah Screening"  (International Journal of Emerging Markets, forthcoming) Tauhidul Islam Tanin (Monash University) and Faruq Ahmad (Islamic Economics Institute) argue that Islamic finance must incorporate a method whereby "the ethical screening of stocks" is integrated into the screening process for … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Commentarial Ocean

By Mahmood Kooria The postclassical commentarial literature of Islamic law, once ignored for being repetitive and inauthentic, now has been receiving considerable scholarly attention. Through the processes of canonization, codification, regionalization, synthesis and transregional connections; forms such as core texts, commentaries, supercommentaries, autocommentaries, glosses, translations and summaries; and contents such as substantive laws, contextual selections … Continue reading Commentarial Ocean

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A California Court of Appeals refused to apply Iranian law in a case involving a plaintiff whose work in Iran exposed him to high levels of asbestos, reasoning that Iranian law reflects religious ideology instead of economic interest. The All India Muslim Personal Law Board issued a statement urging Muslims in India to adhere to Islamic … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A “Jabri” madhhab of the early modern Sudan?

By Kristina L. Richardson Given the centuries of exposure to northern African Islamic thought like Khārijism, Ibāḍism, and Mālikism, could sub-Saharan Muslims have established an indigenous, perhaps syncretic, Islamic legal school? 17th-century Ottoman explorer Evliya Çelebi claimed as much, though we may have to take his descriptions with a grain of salt. Between August 1672 … Continue reading A “Jabri” madhhab of the early modern Sudan?

Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel

By Kristina L. Richardson For centuries the Sunnī Mālikī madhhab has predominated among Muslims of northern and western Africa, but before the 12th century, Shīʿī, Khārijī, and Ibāḍī legal schools vied for dominance.[1] Merchants living under the Ibāḍī Rustamids (779-909, capital in Tāhart) and in independent Khārijī states in the western Maghrib, such as the … Continue reading Ibāḍism in the Medieval Sahel