COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

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Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Hajj and Umrah announces that the Kingdom will impose strict limits on this year’s Hajj in order to protect the health and safety of pilgrims. Several top jurists and organizations globally back the Saudi decision to hold ‘limited’ Hajj this year due to COVID-19. The Research Group on Family and Succession … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

In the News: Molla Sali v. Greece

This Thursday, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) unanimously held that Greece owed a Greek woman by the name of Molla Sali 51,000 euros ($57,000) in damages plus expenses “for siding with her late husband’s two sisters and for applying ‘Sharia law to a section of its citizens against their wishes.’” This judgment follows a 2018 decision by the same court in Molla … Continue reading In the News: Molla Sali v. Greece

In the News: The Challenge of Navigating Sharīʿa Financing for Education

Testimonies from Muslim students studying in the United Kingdom note the challenge of navigating sharīʿa financing with banks that are not sharīʿa-compliant. Metro UK reporter Faima Bakar writes, “the limitations put on borrowing can stop students from pursuing university altogether. Those who still choose to study via halal means, such as borrowing money from their … Continue reading In the News: The Challenge of Navigating Sharīʿa Financing for Education

In the News: China Cracks Down on the Hui Minority

News coverage on crackdowns in China have predominantly covered the plight of the Uighurs. However, efforts to strip the members of the Hui minority in China of their religious heritage are underway. The Hui, who number 10 million, hoped that the state crackdown would not arrive in the Gansu province, as it had in Xinjiang.  … Continue reading In the News: China Cracks Down on the Hui Minority