Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

By Mehdi Berriah This is part two in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. First Episode The first episode took place in dhū-l-qaʿda 657/November 1259, after Quṭuz dismissed al-Manṣūr ʿAlī, the son of his former master, the first Mamlūk sultan al-Muʿizz Aybak (d. 655/1257), and proclaimed himself sultan. The … Continue reading Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Finance Guru, a UK-based Islamic finance platform, recently raised £3 million in investments. The Saudi Crown Prince's overhaul of the country's legal system and practices traditionally thought as being mandated by sharī'a has given rise to discontent among some of the population. Ahead of the national Islamophobia summit, the National Council of Canadian Muslims … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "The Application of Maqasid Al-Shari’ah in the Foreign Policy of Islamic States" (International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 2021), Usman Safiyanu Duguri and others discuss the relevance of the objectives of Islamic law (maqāsid al-sharī'a) to how Muslim-majority nations formulate their foreign policies, with an added observation that maqāsid al-sharī'a … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

By Petra Sijpesteijn (Leiden University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Two … Continue reading The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire