The Neglected History of Furūʿ and the Premodern/Modern Binary

By Marion Katz (New York University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading The Neglected History of Furūʿ and the Premodern/Modern Binary

Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

By Metin M. Coşgel (University of Connecticut) & Boğaç A. Ergene (University of Vermont) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar … Continue reading Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In Legal Maxims in Islamic Law: Concept, History and Application of Axioms of Juristic Accumulation (Leiden: Brill, 2021) (forthcoming), Necmettin Kizilkaya (Istanbul University) addresses the formation of Islamic law maxims "from a conceptual, historical, and implementational perspective." Rather than focusing on descriptions of maxims, Kizilkaya investigates the context and reasons behind their emergence.

Writing Islamic Legal History

By Rula J. Abisaab (McGill University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Scholars … Continue reading Writing Islamic Legal History

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Intisar Rabb (Harvard Law School; Editor-in-Chief, Islamic Law Blog), Fahad Bishara (University of Virginia), Joel Blecher (George Washington University), Saadia Yacoob (Williams College), and Joshua White (University of Virginia) were brought together by the Ottoman History Podcast to discuss the question "What is Islamic Law?" in the first episode of a forthcoming series of podcasts … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

What is Islamic Law? Scholars Discussed in a Recent Podcast!

The Ottoman History Podcast Project brought together both established and emerging scholars to provide insights into a simply worded, yet perennial question, "What is Islamic Law?" - the first episode narrated by Chris Gratien in what is to become a series of episodes under the title "The Making of the Islamic World," "aimed at providing … Continue reading What is Islamic Law? Scholars Discussed in a Recent Podcast!

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

Studying a Lived Law: An Interview with Yossef Rapoport

This interview was conducted by Omar Abdel-Ghaffar (Harvard University, PhD student). This interview is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and … Continue reading Studying a Lived Law: An Interview with Yossef Rapoport

Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions