Enjoying the Law: Legal Riddling at the Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part three in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As the rulers of a vast realm in which Islam was the dominant religion, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate (1250–1517) seem to have considered knowledge about Islamic legal norms … Continue reading Enjoying the Law: Legal Riddling at the Mamlūk Court

Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

By Christian Mauder This is part two in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As former slave soldiers (mamlūks) of non-Muslim origin, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate did not acquire a natural familiarity with Islamic legal norms in their childhood and youth. Many … Continue reading Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part one in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. Many students of Islamic history are fascinated by the unusual polity that ruled Egypt, Syria, and neighboring regions from about 1250 to 1517 CE. This political entity was dominated by a small elite group … Continue reading Legal Diversity at the Late Mamlūk Court

Welcome to our October Guest Blogger: Christian Mauder

Christian Mauder is Associate Professor in the Study of Religions with Specialization in Islam at the University of Bergen. His research focuses on the intellectual, religious, and social history of the Islamic world during the late middle and early modern periods. His recently published second monograph In the Sultan’s Salon: Learning, Religion and Rulership at … Continue reading Welcome to our October Guest Blogger: Christian Mauder

Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

By Mehdi Berriah This is part two in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. First Episode The first episode took place in dhū-l-qaʿda 657/November 1259, after Quṭuz dismissed al-Manṣūr ʿAlī, the son of his former master, the first Mamlūk sultan al-Muʿizz Aybak (d. 655/1257), and proclaimed himself sultan. The … Continue reading Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

Welcome to our September Guest Blogger: Mehdi Berriah

Dr. Mehdi Berriah is Assistant Professor of Classical Arabic and Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Religion and Theology of the Vrije Universiteit (VU) Amsterdam. He is a member of the Centre for Islamic Theology (CIT) at VU Amsterdam. He also teaches Modern Standard Arabic at Sciences Po Paris University. Before joining VU Amsterdam, Mehdi … Continue reading Welcome to our September Guest Blogger: Mehdi Berriah

Welcome to our August Guest Blogger: Hossein Modarressi

Hossein Modarressi is the Bayard Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies and Professor of Islamic Law at Princeton University where he has taught since 1983. He attended the Islamic seminary at Qom (Iran) where he received a complete traditional Islamic education in Islamic philosophy, theology and law, ending with a certificate of ijtihād. He also … Continue reading Welcome to our August Guest Blogger: Hossein Modarressi

Welcome to our July Guest Blogger: Nurfadzilah Yahaya

It is our pleasure to welcome Nurfadzilah Yahaya as our July guest blog editor. Nurfadzilah Yahaya is a historian at the National University of Singapore. She specializes in legal history, histories of Southeast Asia, Islamic law, mobilities, and the Indian Ocean. She received her PhD in History at Princeton University in 2012. Between 2012 and 2015, … Continue reading Welcome to our July Guest Blogger: Nurfadzilah Yahaya

Welcome to our June Guest Blogger: Ayman Shabana

It is our pleasure to welcome Ayman Shabana as our June guest blog editor. Dr. Ayman Shabana is Associate Research Professor at Georgetown University in Qatar. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, his MA from Leiden University in the Netherlands, and his BA from al-Azhar University in Egypt. His teaching … Continue reading Welcome to our June Guest Blogger: Ayman Shabana

Welcome to our May Guest Blogger: Mahmood Kooria

It is our pleasure to welcome Mahmood Kooria as our May guest blog editor. Mahmood Kooria holds research positions at Leiden University (the Netherlands) and University of Bergen (Norway), and is a Visiting Faculty of History at Ashoka University (India). Earlier he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the International Institute for Asian Studies (IIAS) … Continue reading Welcome to our May Guest Blogger: Mahmood Kooria