What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

By Joseph Lowry (University of Pennsylvania) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I … Continue reading What Is Islamic Law? How Should We Study It?

::Roundtable:: Islamic Legal History & Historiography: Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law

Credit: Muslimheritage.com Credit: Muslimheritage.com

Edited by Intisar A. Rabb (Harvard Law School) and Mariam Sheibani (University of Toronto)* In light of recent developments in the field, this Roundtable on Islamic Legal History and Historiography is designed to take stock of the state of the field. We invited leading and emerging scholars of Islamic law and history to weigh in … Continue reading ::Roundtable:: Islamic Legal History & Historiography: Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law

Islam and Data Science Roundup

In "Distribution of Inheritance under Islamic Law: An Appraisal of Online Inheritance Calculators" (August 16, 2020 (SSRN)), Shahbaz Ahmad Cheema (Punjab University, Law College) investigates the accuracy and efficiency of online inheritance calculators that compute shares in accordance with Islamic inheritance law. While noting that the accuracy and efficiency of these calculators vary, the author … Continue reading Islam and Data Science Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Michael Goodyear's (University of Michigan Law School) "Heaven or Earth: The Hagia Sophia Re-Conversion, Turkish and International Law, and Universal Religious Sites" (UCLA Journal of Islamic Law and Near Eastern Law (2021) (forthcoming)) takes a closer look at the recent Turkish court decision that enabled the reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque. While … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

On Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

The 43rd annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture organized by Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law hosted our Editor-in-Chief, Intisar Rabb, with her presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law." The presentation concerned the Mamlūk Empire during the thirteenth century, with a focus on the judicial overhaul overseen by its Sultan Baibars I. In her presentation, … Continue reading On Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

Why we should start with women

By Mona Oraby This is the second of two essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is "Islamic law and the liberal arts." The open curriculum at Amherst means that I mostly teach a captive audience. There are no gen-ed requirements to drive enrollment. Students who show up for my … Continue reading Why we should start with women

Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

By Mona Oraby This essay is the first of three essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The second is “Why we should start with women” and the third is “Faculty-student collaboration during Covid-19.” I teach a course called Islamic Constitutionalism at Amherst College. Colleagues at other institutions are often surprised and flattered when … Continue reading Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region Regulation on De-Radicalization

By Limeng Sun This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Regulation Summary: In March 2017, Xinjiang, a territory in northwest China, enacted the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region Regulation on De-Radicalization (“2017 Regulation”), which designated … Continue reading Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region Regulation on De-Radicalization

Interpreting Sharī’a in Amina Lawal v. State

By Limeng Sun This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Case Summary: This blog post examines Amina Lawal v. State, a criminal case adjudicated by the Sharī‘a Court of Appeal of Katsina State, Nigeria.[1] … Continue reading Interpreting Sharī’a in Amina Lawal v. State