The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: Khursheed Ahmad Khan v. State of U.P. is a recent Indian Supreme Court case. Khursheed Ahmad Khan (appellant), a Muslim civil servant, married … Continue reading The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

Shifting Religious Landscapes: From Istanbul to Ayodhya

By Abtsam Saleh This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. On 9 November 2019, the Supreme Court of India declared the final judgement in the case regarding disputed land in the Ayodhya region in … Continue reading Shifting Religious Landscapes: From Istanbul to Ayodhya

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "A Secular Need: Islamic Law and State Governance in Contemporary India," The University of Washington Press, Jeffrey A. Redding explores India’s non-state system of Muslim dispute resolution—known as the dar-ul-qaza system and commonly referred to as “Muslim courts” or “sharīʿa courts”—challenges conventional narratives about the inevitable opposition between Islamic law and secular forms of governance, … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

About three months ago, the Indian government formally criminalized “triple ṭalāq” divorce—an instant and irrevocable divorce under some versions of Islamic law where a husband can unilaterally divorce his wife by saying the word ṭalāq (divorce) three times. The Supreme Court of India had ruled last August that the practice of “triple ṭalāq” was unconstitutional. … Continue reading In the News: Triple Ṭalāq Criminalized in India

Round-up on Triple Ṭalāq

SUPREME COURT CASE: Shayara Bano v. Union of India, etc. (Supreme Court of India)  In a 3-2 decision, the Supreme Court of India declared triple ṭalāq unconstitutional and gave India’s parliament six months “to consider legislation” for handling triple ṭalāq. In its opinion, the Court cited global advances in Islamic family law (in India, called Muslim … Continue reading Round-up on Triple Ṭalāq

In Response to the Indian Supreme Court’s Recent Decision on Triple Ṭalāq: A Legislative Proposal

The Indian Supreme Court's decision on triple ṭalāq declared it unconstitutional, and gave the legislature six months to decide on appropriate reform. Pakistan editor Zubair Abbasi responds to the decision and outlines considerations the legislature should address. "According to media reports, triple ṭalāq (instant, irrevocable divorce initiated by a husband in some versions of Islamic law) epitomizes … Continue reading In Response to the Indian Supreme Court’s Recent Decision on Triple Ṭalāq: A Legislative Proposal

Shayara Bano v. Union of India, etc. (Supreme Court of India): Judgment on Constitutionalism of Triple Ṭalāq

In a 3-2 decision, the Supreme Court of India declared triple ṭalāq unconstitutional and gave India’s parliament six months “to consider legislation” for handling triple ṭalāq. In its opinion, the Court cited global advances in Islamic family law (in India, called Muslim personal law) in “even theocratic Islamic states” as evidence of the need for reform.  The Court … Continue reading Shayara Bano v. Union of India, etc. (Supreme Court of India): Judgment on Constitutionalism of Triple Ṭalāq

Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India

Indian Muslim women's rights are once again manifesting as debates about talaq (divorce). Shayara Bano, who holds an advanced degree in sociology, petitioned the Indian Supreme Court last year to rule on the constitutionalism of triple-ṭalāq, in which a Muslim husband may divorce his wife by simply saying "ṭalāq" three times with our without her consent. After she suffered … Continue reading Women’s Right to Divorce under Islamic Law in Pakistan and India