Child Marriage and Islamic Law: A Decision of the Oberlandsgericht in Bamberg (Germany)

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: After fleeing worn-torn Syria, a married Syrian Sunnī couple, a fourteen-year old woman, A, and twenty-one-year old man, H, arrived in Germany. Because … Continue reading Child Marriage and Islamic Law: A Decision of the Oberlandsgericht in Bamberg (Germany)

Why we should start with women

By Mona Oraby This is the second of two essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is "Islamic law and the liberal arts." The open curriculum at Amherst means that I mostly teach a captive audience. There are no gen-ed requirements to drive enrollment. Students who show up for my … Continue reading Why we should start with women

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

COVID-19 Handling Committee Head and Minister of State Enterprises of Indonesia, Erick Thohir,  announces that Indonesia is ready to obtain 30 million doses of vaccine by the end of 2020,  which the Minister says would be ḥalāl in accordance with Islamic law.

A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: In November 2009, Switzerland passed a popular initiative prohibiting the construction of minarets. In response, Mr. Ouardiri, a Muslim living in Switzerland, challenged … Continue reading A Popular Initiative to Ban Minarets and Its Human Rights Implications

Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

By Mona Oraby I teach a course called Islamic Constitutionalism at Amherst College. Colleagues at other institutions are often surprised and flattered when I tell them I use their casebooks, International Journal of Constitutional Law articles, and monographs in my teaching. Flattered because, well, it’s always flattering to hear that what we write is read … Continue reading Islamic Law and the Liberal Arts

The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: Khursheed Ahmad Khan v. State of U.P. is a recent Indian Supreme Court case. Khursheed Ahmad Khan (appellant), a Muslim civil servant, married … Continue reading The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

Recent Case Roundup: On the Turkish Decision on the Kariye Mosque

On November 11, 2019, a division of Turkey's highest administrative appellate court annulled a presidential decision dated 1945 by Ismet Inonu, the second president of the Turkish Republic and the successor to Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, the founding president of the country, that had converted the Kariye Mosque into a museum. Prior to the conquest of … Continue reading Recent Case Roundup: On the Turkish Decision on the Kariye Mosque

Welcome to our September Guest Blogger: Mona Oraby

It is our pleasure to welcome Mona Oraby as our September guest blog editor. Mona Oraby is Assistant Professor of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought at Amherst College. Her research sits at the intersection of law, religion, and politics, and focuses on group formation, membership, and belonging. Before joining Amherst, she was the Jerome Hall … Continue reading Welcome to our September Guest Blogger: Mona Oraby

September DILL Student Comment :: Nathalie Gunasekera

The Islamic Law Blog is continuing to feature Harvard student comments on primary sources related to Islamic law. Our student editor for September is Nathalie, a third-year student at Harvard Law School. Each month, we feature a series of three comments written by a student in the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL), an incubator for … Continue reading September DILL Student Comment :: Nathalie Gunasekera

Thank you, Zubair Abbasi!

Thank you, Zubair Abbasi, for joining us as guest blog editor throughout August. In case you missed any of his blog posts, here they are: Islamic Constitutionalism in Pakistan: Does It Matter? Islamic Constitutionalism in Pakistan: Is It Theocratic? The Impact of Islamic Judicial Review in Pakistan Islamic Judicial Review in Practice (1): Decolonization through … Continue reading Thank you, Zubair Abbasi!