Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

By Christian Mauder This is part two in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As former slave soldiers (mamlūks) of non-Muslim origin, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate did not acquire a natural familiarity with Islamic legal norms in their childhood and youth. Many … Continue reading Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Sharī‘ah-Compliant Equities and Sharī‘ah Screening: Need for Convergence of Ethical Screening of Stocks with Sharī‘ah Screening"  (International Journal of Emerging Markets, forthcoming) Tauhidul Islam Tanin (Monash University) and Faruq Ahmad (Islamic Economics Institute) argue that Islamic finance must incorporate a method whereby "the ethical screening of stocks" is integrated into the screening process for … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Peace to those of Faith: Political Affiliation and Belonging in Classical Islamic Thought" (Routledge Handbook of Citizenship in the Middle East and North Africa 2021), Omar Farahat (McGill University Faculty of Law) discusses the concept of belonging in classical Islamic thought, focusing on multilayered descriptions of tribal identity. In "Eradicating Gender-Based Violence against Female-Intimate … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

By Najam Haider (Barnard College) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I should … Continue reading Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

Panel: Why You Should Study Legal History, Program in Law & History (Harvard Law School), November 2, 2020 @12:00 – 1:00 pm

Please join us next Monday, November 2 at 12:00pm for a very special virtual event, “Why You Should Study Legal History.”  You will have the opportunity to hear from distinguished legal historians, to learn more about the Program in Law & History, and to have your questions answered! Please register here to receive a Zoom … Continue reading Panel: Why You Should Study Legal History, Program in Law & History (Harvard Law School), November 2, 2020 @12:00 – 1:00 pm

Comparative law, the role of the judge, and the law theorized

In this final post reflecting on my primary source seminar “Readings in Islamic law,” I want to highlight three further topics covered in the course. The first of these is the genre of comparative law (khilāf), for which we read writings by Ibn al-Mundhir from the early fourth/tenth century, al-Kadamī from the fourth/tenth century, and … Continue reading Comparative law, the role of the judge, and the law theorized

Fatwas: diverse in form, diverse in reach

After the first session of my Islamic law seminar this fall, I chose the readings for each class with an eye on the particular interests of the enrolled students. Accordingly, of the three fatwas we read, spanning the fourteenth and twentieth centuries, the first reflected one student’s interest in medical ethics. The fatwa in question … Continue reading Fatwas: diverse in form, diverse in reach