Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Peace to those of Faith: Political Affiliation and Belonging in Classical Islamic Thought" (Routledge Handbook of Citizenship in the Middle East and North Africa 2021), Omar Farahat (McGill University Faculty of Law) discusses the concept of belonging in classical Islamic thought, focusing on multilayered descriptions of tribal identity. In "Eradicating Gender-Based Violence against Female-Intimate … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

By Najam Haider (Barnard College) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I should … Continue reading Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

Panel: Why You Should Study Legal History, Program in Law & History (Harvard Law School), November 2, 2020 @12:00 – 1:00 pm

Please join us next Monday, November 2 at 12:00pm for a very special virtual event, “Why You Should Study Legal History.”  You will have the opportunity to hear from distinguished legal historians, to learn more about the Program in Law & History, and to have your questions answered! Please register here to receive a Zoom … Continue reading Panel: Why You Should Study Legal History, Program in Law & History (Harvard Law School), November 2, 2020 @12:00 – 1:00 pm

Comparative law, the role of the judge, and the law theorized

In this final post reflecting on my primary source seminar “Readings in Islamic law,” I want to highlight three further topics covered in the course. The first of these is the genre of comparative law (khilāf), for which we read writings by Ibn al-Mundhir from the early fourth/tenth century, al-Kadamī from the fourth/tenth century, and … Continue reading Comparative law, the role of the judge, and the law theorized

Fatwas: diverse in form, diverse in reach

After the first session of my Islamic law seminar this fall, I chose the readings for each class with an eye on the particular interests of the enrolled students. Accordingly, of the three fatwas we read, spanning the fourteenth and twentieth centuries, the first reflected one student’s interest in medical ethics. The fatwa in question … Continue reading Fatwas: diverse in form, diverse in reach

Different genres, different approaches

For the first session of my graduate seminar “Readings in Islamic Law” this fall, I asked students to read two texts: a hadith on divorce initiated by the wife (al-Bukhārī, Kitāb al-Khulʿ, story of the wife of Thābit b. Qays) and a legal debate between Abū Isḥāq al-Shīrāzī and al-Dāmaghānī in the eleventh century (from … Continue reading Different genres, different approaches

Teaching Islamic law through primary sources

In the fall quarter of 2019, I am teaching a graduate seminar titled “Readings in Islamic Law” at the University of Chicago. In this blog post and the three that follow I will describe the theoretical and practical considerations that have influenced the design of the course and talk about some of the readings I … Continue reading Teaching Islamic law through primary sources

Book Talk: Islamic Criminal Law in Conversation with Kamali’s “Felony and the Guilty Mind in Medieval England”

Join the Harvard Law School Library community and Intisar Rabb, Professor of Law, Professor of History, and Faculty Director, Program in Islamic Law, Harvard Law School, among other scholars, in a conversation around Felony and the Guilty Mind in Medieval England (Cambridge Univ. Press, Oct. 31, 2019), a recent publication by Elizabeth Papp Kamali, Assistant Professor of Law … Continue reading Book Talk: Islamic Criminal Law in Conversation with Kamali’s “Felony and the Guilty Mind in Medieval England”