Islamic Law in the News Roundup

A Reuters investigation of Indonesia's banking and finance sector revealed that an increasing number of Muslims employed in that sector are "quitting traditional banks" citing concerns of incompatibility with Islamic law. Former Minister of European Affairs of Portugal, Bruno Macaes, stated that Islam "is part of European history and culture," adding that "it's not a … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Algerian scholar on Islam, Said Djabelkhir, was sentenced to three years of prison for "offending Islam" in three Facebook posts calling for "reflection" on Islam's foundational texts. Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan urged Western European countries to criminalize blasphemy against Islam. Faith-based investing opportunities have grown over the past years, as financial institutions and investment … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

On April 12, Pakistani forces arrested Saad Rizvi, the head of the recently outlawed Tehreek-e-Labbaik Pakistan (TLP), who called for civil disobedience unless the French ambassador is expelled - a reaction against what he considered blasphemous depictions of the Prophet in French media outlets. An Egyptian Ramadan TV series, Al Tawoos (literally, peacock), is investigated … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Kerala High Court (India) recently overturned a decades-long precedent that had prohibited Muslim women from divorcing their husbands without judicial intervention.  In its new decision, the Court noted that judicial intervention was warranted only in faskh cases that involved the intervention of an Islamic judge, thereby recognizing the right of Muslim women to dissolve … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In an opinion piece published on the Jurist, entitled "Nigeria court overturns two blasphemy convictions after international outcry" Marie Feyche (U. Pittsburgh School of Law) reports that the High Court of Kano (Nigeria) overturned two blasphemy convictions handed down by a sharī'a court, after international outcry. In "DNA Evidence and the Islamic Law of Paternity … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The High Court of Kano (Nigeria) overturned two blasphemy convictions by a sharī'a court, following weeks of international outcry. The Muslim Spiritual Board of the Republic of Tatarstan launched the "Online Madrasah" project, described as an "online alternative" to popular "sheiks" preaching online.

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Details of France’s proposed bill to counter what President Macron called “Islamic separatism” began to emerge: the bill seeks to criminalize disclosing data about a person’s location to those who might do harm, to provide for summary trials for perpetrators of online hate crimes, to empower judges to prevent individuals with a certain criminal history … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Amid international outcry after a Nigerian religious court sentenced a 22-year old to death for blasphemous statements made on WhatsApp, a well-known imām (Muslim religious leader) in the country, who believes that the person should be punished, asked for a more lenient sentence. Nigerian Senator Smart Adeyemi announced his intention to advance a bill that … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup