In the News: Sri Lanka’s Emergency Law

A ban on face coverings in Sri Lanka following the Easter Sunday attacks has once again highlighted the issue of restrictions on religious freedoms in response to public safety concerns. According to the ban: No person shall wear in any public place any garment, clothing or such other material concealing the full face which will … Continue reading In the News: Sri Lanka’s Emergency Law

In the News: Brunei

Last week, Brunei enacted its long-standing draft criminal law bill that it first proposed in 2014 in an attempt to bring state control over crime, in a way that responds to both conventional and Islamic traditional norms. Celebrities and media commentators have widely criticized the bill, as reported in major media outlets, for making gay … Continue reading In the News: Brunei

In the News: Indonesia’s Ḥalāl Labeling Law

  Last month, the Indonesian government decided to postpone an October 2019 deadline requiring all consumer goods sold in the country to be certified ḥalāl. According to a 2014 Indonesian law, all food, beverages, drugs, cosmetics, chemical, biological, and genetically engineered products, as well as “consumer goods that are worn, used, or utilized by the … Continue reading In the News: Indonesia’s Ḥalāl Labeling Law

In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

Two weeks ago, the European Court of Justice—the EU’s highest court—ruled that meat derived from animals that were not stunned before being slaughtered could not be labeled “organic.” The Court explained that the “organic” label was developed in response to consumers’ demand for food that protected animals’ welfare, and that scientific studies have shown that … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Meat

In the News: Prison Chaplains

Last month, the U.S. Supreme Court allowed Alabama to execute a Muslim inmate who had filed a legal challenge after prison officials told him he could only have a Christian chaplain present in the execution chamber—but not a Muslim imam. Domineque Ray’s lawyers had argued that the prison’s policy violated the Establishment Clause of the … Continue reading In the News: Prison Chaplains

In the News: “Politicization” of Islamic Law in Europe

Last week, the UK’s Telegraph newspaper published an interview (free registration may be required to read the full article) with Seyran Ates, who in 2017 established a mosque in Germany where men and women pray side by side, and women can lead the prayers. The interview focused on Islamic identity in Europe, and specifically Ates’ … Continue reading In the News: “Politicization” of Islamic Law in Europe

In the News: SHARIAsource Blog

The latest issue of Harvard Law Bulletin, which came out last week, included an article on “Law’s Influencers” featuring blogs led by HLS faculty. The piece features SHARIAsource Blog! Professor Intisar Rabb says that her desire to share diverse viewpoints was a key reason she launched SHARIAsource, a blog she describes as “a SCOTUSblog for … Continue reading In the News: SHARIAsource Blog

In the News: Female Sharīʿa Court Judges

At the end of last year, the BBC compiled a list of “100 inspiring and influential women from around the world.” One of those women was Nenney Shushaidah, who made international headlines in 2016 after she and her colleague became Malaysia’s first female sharīʿa high court judges. In an interview with the BBC, Judge Shushaidah … Continue reading In the News: Female Sharīʿa Court Judges

European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

Last week, the European Court of Human Rights (which examines alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights) handed down its long-anticipated decision in Molla Sali v. Greece, a case about Islamic legal pluralism in Europe and the rights of religious minorities. Stay tuned to the SHARIAsourceBlog for a roundtable discussion on this … Continue reading European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

In the News: Ḥalāl Food

A few weeks ago, Germany's Interior Ministry apologized after serving pork at a conference on Islam in Berlin. Most of the attendees at the conference were apparently Muslim, and under Islamic law, pork is not considered permissible (ḥalāl) to eat. Like other aspects of Islamic law, there are some differences among Islamic legal scholars (and … Continue reading In the News: Ḥalāl Food