Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Conference: Covid-19: implications for the application of family law in MENA countries, 1 July (virtual)

The Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law is holding virtual panel discussion in their series Afternoon Talks on Islamic Law of the Research Group on Family and Succession Law in Islamic Countries titled “Covid-19: implications for the application of family law in MENA countries.” Family laws establish men as providers and partly … Continue reading Conference: Covid-19: implications for the application of family law in MENA countries, 1 July (virtual)

Conference: Fostering Ethics – Islam, Adoption and the Care of Children (25 June, Virtual Conference – University of Cambridge)

The Centre of Islamic Studies and CRASSH at the University of Cambridge are hosting a joint virtual conference on the 25th of June. This event will explore the challenges and possibilities for a new ethics of care for orphaned or abandoned children in Muslim communities. The adoption or fostering of children represents a complex issue … Continue reading Conference: Fostering Ethics – Islam, Adoption and the Care of Children (25 June, Virtual Conference – University of Cambridge)

Shamim Ara and the “Judicialization” of Divorce

By Dixie Morrison This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Case Summary: Shamim Ara v. State of U.P. & Anr. is a family law case decided by the Supreme Court of India in 2002. … Continue reading Shamim Ara and the “Judicialization” of Divorce

Marriage as Children’s Play: Unregistered Islamic Marriages under English Law

That marriage creates certain rights and obligations goes without saying. The legal definition of marriage, however, remains contentious, especially in multicultural, religiously diverse and legally pluralistic states and societies where legal and religious definitions of marriage may differ. The complexity of the issue is exacerbated when courts have to balance private and public interests while … Continue reading Marriage as Children’s Play: Unregistered Islamic Marriages under English Law