Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Juridical Pan-Islam at the Height of Empire" (Comparative Studies of South Asia, Africa and the Middle East 41, no. 2 (August 1, 2021)), Nurfadzilah Yahaya reviews Faiz Ahmed's Afghanistan Rising: Islamic Law and Statecraft between the Ottoman and British Empires (Harvard University Press, 2017),  describing the book as an apt description of how Afghanistan … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Two phenomena struck me as particularly incongruous while researching for my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast and plagued me throughout the process of writing it. The first was “illegal occupations” (‘onwettige occupaties’) which referred to land occupied by populations who were not allowed to own the land according … Continue reading What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya In my book, Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020), I demonstrate how colonialism embodies a contradiction; in a sense, colonial authorities limited and restricted subjects’ lives, but their authority gave rise to a sense of possibility for some colonial subjects perceived to be elite.[1] The largest … Continue reading Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

Welcome to our July Guest Blogger: Nurfadzilah Yahaya

It is our pleasure to welcome Nurfadzilah Yahaya as our July guest blog editor. Nurfadzilah Yahaya is a historian at the National University of Singapore. She specializes in legal history, histories of Southeast Asia, Islamic law, mobilities, and the Indian Ocean. She received her PhD in History at Princeton University in 2012. Between 2012 and 2015, … Continue reading Welcome to our July Guest Blogger: Nurfadzilah Yahaya

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The new issue of the Journal of Islamic Law at Harvard Law School (Journal of Islamic Law 2, no. 1 (2021)) has been published online.  The new issue includes an article by Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University) entitled "Triple Divorce and the Political Context of Islamic Law in India" that discusses the recent enactment of an … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In her book review for Reading Religion (November 19, 2020) of Tamir Moustafa’s (Simon Fraser University) Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State (Cambridge University Press, 2018), Nurfadzilah Yahaya (National University of Singapore) argues that the book showcases how Islamic law is utilized by the country’s political elites “in the service of Malay … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Comparative Law and the Middle East at ASCL 2020! (A PIL Guide)

The Program in Islamic Law (PIL) has curated a list of panels from the American Society of Comparative Law's (ASCL) 2020 Annual Meeting schedule that feature speakers whose submissions are related to the Middle East, Islamic law and history, or Muslim-majority countries.* ASCL's  annual meeting this year, cosponsored by UCLA School of Law International and … Continue reading Comparative Law and the Middle East at ASCL 2020! (A PIL Guide)