Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

By Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University in Qatar) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

Alkamawa v. Bello and Another: Case Considers the Form and Status of Islamic Law in Northern Nigeria

By Terrence George This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Background In the wake of Fulani Sheikh Usman Danfodio’s conquest of Hausaland in 1804, an Islamic legal system was established in what would become … Continue reading Alkamawa v. Bello and Another: Case Considers the Form and Status of Islamic Law in Northern Nigeria

A Few Concluding Remarks on Anglo-Muhammadan Law

This is part 6 and the final post of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. Due to the generally unexplored nature of Anglo-Muhammadan law, I want to conclude my series of blogs with some notes that pinpoint some particular aspects of it that I believe … Continue reading A Few Concluding Remarks on Anglo-Muhammadan Law

Shifting Tides in the Application of Islamic Law: Muslim Judges on Colonial Benches

This is part 5 of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. Court Case: Muhammadan law and Construction of Instrument of Gift Source: Indian Law Reports: Allahabad Series, Volume III Case: Ghulam Ahmad Khan and another (Plaintiffs) v. Muhammad Faiz Ahmad Khan (Defendant), January 27, 1881 … Continue reading Shifting Tides in the Application of Islamic Law: Muslim Judges on Colonial Benches

Overturning Islamic Law: Right of Guardianship of a Minor

This is part 4 of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. In the last two blog entries I explored how the phrase “justice, equity and good conscience” could result in both the application and non-application of Islamic law. In the case of the non-application of … Continue reading Overturning Islamic Law: Right of Guardianship of a Minor

Anglo-Muhammadan Law and “Justice, Equity and Good Conscience” Continued

This is part 3 of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. Case 2: Non-Application of Islamic Law through “Justice, Equity and Good Conscience:” Inheritance of Minors Source: Indian Law Reports: Allahabad Series, Volume I Case: Hasan Ali and another (Plaintiff) v. Mehdi Husain and others … Continue reading Anglo-Muhammadan Law and “Justice, Equity and Good Conscience” Continued

Anglo-Muhammadan Law and “Justice, Equity and Good Conscience”

This is part 2 of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. As noted in the introductory blog post, the application of Anglo-Muhammadan law was varied and uneven. In addition to this being the result of a limited understanding of Islamic law on the part of … Continue reading Anglo-Muhammadan Law and “Justice, Equity and Good Conscience”

The Birth of Anglo-Muhammadan Law in India

This is part 1 of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. For this month’s series, I will examine the rise and implementation of Anglo-Muhammadan law in British India. These posts stem from my current book project which seeks to move beyond the dichotomy of continuity … Continue reading The Birth of Anglo-Muhammadan Law in India

A Tale of Two Contagions: Science, Imperialism, and the 1883 Cholera in Egypt

By Christopher Rose At Cairo, sanitary matters are nearly at a standstill; the executive administration cannot enforce their orders. On Saturday last, the bad feeling … nearly stirred up a rebellion, so that matters looked very serious. The Egyptian lower classes consider all precautions to be impious; “God is Great,” they cry, and all is … Continue reading A Tale of Two Contagions: Science, Imperialism, and the 1883 Cholera in Egypt