Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Intisar Rabb on Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

The 43rd annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture organized by Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law hosted our Editor-in-Chief, Intisar Rabb, with her presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law." The presentation concerned the Mamlūk Empire during the thirteenth century, with a focus on the judicial overhaul overseen by its Sultan Baibars I. In her presentation, … Continue reading Intisar Rabb on Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

Heterodoxy Among Muslim Judges: On Attempts at Jokes and Judicial Constraints

Guest contributor Maribel Fierro examines a scene of heterodoxy in the recently published English translation of The Ultimate Ambition. Translated from Arabic into English for the first time in full by Elias Muhanna of Brown University, The Ultimate Ambition was written in the 14th century by a retired Egyptian bureaucrat named Shihab al-Din al-Nuwayri. Fierro looks at a scene in … Continue reading Heterodoxy Among Muslim Judges: On Attempts at Jokes and Judicial Constraints