Enjoying the Law: Legal Riddling at the Mamlūk Court

By Christian Mauder This is part three in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As the rulers of a vast realm in which Islam was the dominant religion, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate (1250–1517) seem to have considered knowledge about Islamic legal norms … Continue reading Enjoying the Law: Legal Riddling at the Mamlūk Court

Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

By Christian Mauder This is part two in a series of four posts on legal culture at the late Mamlūk court. As former slave soldiers (mamlūks) of non-Muslim origin, many members of the military elite of the Mamlūk Sultanate did not acquire a natural familiarity with Islamic legal norms in their childhood and youth. Many … Continue reading Studying Islamic Law in the Mamlūk Barracks

The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

By Mehdi Berriah This is part one in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. While the spirit and laws of jihād have often attracted the attention of researchers, this is not the case for its economic aspect, which remains poorly known. It must be kept in mind … Continue reading The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Peace to those of Faith: Political Affiliation and Belonging in Classical Islamic Thought" (Routledge Handbook of Citizenship in the Middle East and North Africa 2021), Omar Farahat (McGill University Faculty of Law) discusses the concept of belonging in classical Islamic thought, focusing on multilayered descriptions of tribal identity. In "Eradicating Gender-Based Violence against Female-Intimate … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Live Webinar Panel View: Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, March 5, 2021

Credit: Muslimheritage.com Credit: Muslimheritage.com

The Program in Islamic Law is proud to host a live webinar to conclude and discuss the various contributions to the Roundtable on Islamic Legal History and Historiography! The Zoom Webinar / Live Roundtable, which will take place on Friday, March 5, 2021 @ 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (EST), will take stock of the state … Continue reading Live Webinar Panel View: Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, March 5, 2021

Announcement: Friday Live Webinar on Islamic Legal History & Historiography

Credit: Muslimheritage.com Credit: Muslimheritage.com

Last December we launched our Roundtable on Islamic Legal History and Historiography, which brought together leading and emerging scholars of Islamic law and history to weigh in on diverse approaches to questions of method and meaning in Islamic law and legal history. After publishing twenty one essays throughout December, January, and February, the Roundtable will culminate this week, on Friday, March … Continue reading Announcement: Friday Live Webinar on Islamic Legal History & Historiography

Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

By Intisar Rabb This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in a short post, also by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Introduction* We’ve all … Continue reading Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

Roundtable on Islamic Legal History and Historiography: Week in Review

Credit: Muslimheritage.com Credit: Muslimheritage.com

On December 10, 2020, the Islamic Law Blog launched its Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography: Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor). The Roundtable’s inaugural introductory essay “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction,” is authored by Intisar Rabb, who succinctly introduces the themes and purpose … Continue reading Roundtable on Islamic Legal History and Historiography: Week in Review