Documents of Sale as Living Objects

By Athina Pfeiffer Professor Marina Rustow's note: "Having been asked twice now to contribute to the ILB, I’ve been making my way into the corpus of Islamic notarial documents preserved in Cairo Geniza. In the hope of understanding them better, I taught a PhD seminar on them in Fall 2022. Two of my students, Amel … Continue reading Documents of Sale as Living Objects

Getting to know iqrārs

By Amel Bensalim Professor Marina Rustow's note: "Having been asked twice now to contribute to the ILB, I’ve been making my way into the corpus of Islamic notarial documents preserved in Cairo Geniza. In the hope of understanding them better, I taught a PhD seminar on them in Fall 2022. Two of my students, Amel … Continue reading Getting to know iqrārs

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law In "The Probate Regime: Enchanted Bureaucracy, Islamic Law, and the Capital of Orphans in Nineteenth-Century Egypt" (Law and History Review (2022)), Adam Mestyan (Duke University) and Rezk Nori (Center for Contemporary History of Egypt) "explore the 'probate regime,' an administrative field of government activity of legally transferring, taxing, and administering … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Why I No Longer Use the Term “Qāḍī-Court Documents”

By Marina Rustow I came into my graduate seminar on Arabic legal documents with some experience in paleography and diplomatics, but vanishingly little knowledge of the material I was going to be teaching. I knew I wouldn’t always, or even often, have answers about how to read the sources, let alone how the judicial system … Continue reading Why I No Longer Use the Term “Qāḍī-Court Documents”

Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

By Marina Rustow Legal documents have survived from the medieval Islamic world in considerable quantity, but the mystery of their quotidian production and use abides. The mystery concerns personnel and physical location: Who wrote documents, and where? Where did witnesses sign them? To what extent were judges involved in their production and handling? Over the … Continue reading Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law In "The Long Arm of the Provincial Law: A Custody Battle in a Qāḍī Petition from the Medieval Fayyūm" (Al-ʿUṣūr al-Wusṭā 30 (2022)), Lev Weitz (Catholic University of America) "presents an edition, translation, and study of a short Arabic petition to a qāḍī and the rescript issued in response." In … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Ottoman Empire: War and Peace” by Will Smiley and Aimee Genell

Summarized by Hadi Qazwini This post is part of the Roundtable on the History of Islamic International Law.  It is a summary of Will Smiley and Aimee Genell's and contribution titled "Ottoman Empire: War and Peace" to volume eight of the Cambridge History of International Law series, co-edited by Intisar Rabb and Umut Özsu. Will … Continue reading ::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Ottoman Empire: War and Peace” by Will Smiley and Aimee Genell

::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Dispute Settlement in the Medieval Islamic World” by Mathieu Tillier

Summarized by Rami Koujah This post is part of the Roundtable on the History of Islamic International Law.  It is a summary of Mathieu Tillier's contribution titled "Dispute Settlement in the Medieval Islamic World" to volume eight of the Cambridge History of International Law series, co-edited by Intisar Rabb and Umut Özsu. Mathieu Tillier’s chapter … Continue reading ::Roundtable:: History of Islamic International Law: “Dispute Settlement in the Medieval Islamic World” by Mathieu Tillier

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law In Maqasid Al-Shari'ah as Philosophy of Islamic Law: A Systems Approach (The International Institute of Islamic Thought 2022), Jasser Auda (Research Center for Islamic Legislation and Ethics, Qatar) proposes a new theory to categorize theories for Islamic law. In "A seat at the table: Islamic laws neglected potential in universalising … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law In "Explainer: How Sharia Law is More Progressive Than the US Supreme Court on Abortion" (Jurist, October 27, 2022), Mohamed Arafa (Alexandria University Faculty of Law (Egypt) & Cornell University) argues "that the Islamic stance on abortion is more liberal than that of the US legal regime in its current … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup