Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the third in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. In late 2010, a Tunisian fruit seller, frustrated by restrictions on his ability to make a living and constant police harassment, poured gasoline on himself and lit a match. This was largely viewed as the … Continue reading Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

The Modern Transformation of the Duty to Fight

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the second in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. In my prior post, I provided a cursory sketch of juristic thought on collective duties between the third/ninth and eighth/fourteenth centuries. Here, I want to demonstrate the potential of premodern thought on legal obligation by … Continue reading The Modern Transformation of the Duty to Fight

Collective Duties (farḍ kifāya) in Islamic Law

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the first in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. Among the most significant challenges in studying or teaching Islamic law is situating it within its proper normative framework. Unfortunately, an account of Islamic law’s historical growth and development is often considered sufficient for understanding … Continue reading Collective Duties (farḍ kifāya) in Islamic Law

Ijtihād on Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

By Nicholas Kellum This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. In 1983 at its Third Islamic Summit Conference, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation founded the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (“IIFA”).[1]  Based in Jeddah, Saudi … Continue reading Ijtihād on Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Ijtihād on Artificial Insemination

By Nicholas Kellum This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab.  In 1983 at its Third Islamic Summit Conference, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation founded the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (“IIFA”).[1]  Based in Jeddah, Saudi … Continue reading Ijtihād on Artificial Insemination

Does Islamic Law Support Human Cloning?

In 1983 at its Third Islamic Summit Conference, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation founded the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (“IIFA”).[1]  Based in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the IIFA is tasked with the advancement of knowledge in the fields of culture, science, and economics.[2]  The IIFA engages in ijtihād—Islamic legal interpretation—to evaluate technological and social developments and … Continue reading Does Islamic Law Support Human Cloning?

The Immanent Frame:: Book Review: Law, Authority, and Tradition

By Omar Farahat Rumee Ahmed’s Sharia Compliant: A User’s Guide to Hacking Islamic Law is a unique book in that it tackles some of the most difficult questions in the clearest and most accessible language. In doing so, it pushes us out of the comfort of our specialized research and jargon, and forces us to … Continue reading The Immanent Frame:: Book Review: Law, Authority, and Tradition

“How anti-Shariah marches mistake Muslim concepts of state and religious law”: Asifa Quraishi-Landes in the Religion News Service

In the wake of anti-sharīʿa marches across the United States,  Senior Scholar Asifa Quraishi-Landes clarifies in the Religion News Service the history of state and religious law in Islamic legal history. Read the entire article.  "To make things even more complicated for American observers, fiqh doesn’t neatly fit into Western categories of law and morality. … Continue reading “How anti-Shariah marches mistake Muslim concepts of state and religious law”: Asifa Quraishi-Landes in the Religion News Service

REVIEW: Judges on Cushions and Under Trees: Thoughts on “Qāḍī Justice” and Hyperpolemics (A Review of Intisar Rabb, “Against Kadijustiz” (2015))

Guest contributor Haider Hamoudi reviews Professor Intisar Rabb's, SHARIAsource founding editor-in-chief, new article in the Suffolk Law Review entitled Against Kadijustiz: On the Negative Citation of Foreign Law. Rabb focuses on how American courts have utilized inaccurate portrayals of "qāḍī justice" as antitheses to American court procedures. Hamoudi notes that this point is all the more important when one … Continue reading REVIEW: Judges on Cushions and Under Trees: Thoughts on “Qāḍī Justice” and Hyperpolemics (A Review of Intisar Rabb, “Against Kadijustiz” (2015))