Weekend Scholarship Roundup

D. Fairchild Ruggles’ Tree of Pearls The Extraordinary Architectural Patronage of the 13th-Century Egyptian Slave-Queen Shajar al-Durr (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020) provides insight into the remarkable life of Shajar al-Durr, an enslaved child who went on to become the Sultan of Egypt in the 13th century. This biography places the rise and fall of the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In the article “Did Premodern Muslims Distinguish the Religious and Secular? The Dīn–Dunyā Binary in Medieval Islamic Thought” (Journal of Islamic Studies, Volume 31, Issue 2, 2020), Rushain Abbasi challenges the widely-held belief that premodern Muslims did not make a distinction between the religious and secular. After examining several usages of the dīn–dunyā binary across … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Apostasy and Freedom of Religion in Malaysia," Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal, Joshua Neoh argues that the constitutional space for the freedom of religion in Malaysia is best carved out by drawing on constitutional law, international law and the common law. Heidi Gilchrist explores laws that criminalize dress in Europe … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Polymorphous Discrimination: Rohingya Women in the Goggles of Intersectionality," Islamic Law and the Muslim World eJournal, Shadrack Bentil and Edmund Poku Adu analyze the plight of Rohingya women in the Rakhine State in Myanmar using intersectionality theory, in order to identify the grounds on which Rohingya women are methodically discriminated. The paper reveals multi-faceted structural discrimination … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Elizabeth Urban explores the ways in which new Muslims of slave origins were integrated into early Islamic society in "Conquered Populations in Early Islam; Non-Arabs, Slaves and the Sons of Slave Mothers," Edinburgh University Press. The book focuses on Muslims of slave origins, who belonged to the society in which they lived but whose slave … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "A Secular Need: Islamic Law and State Governance in Contemporary India," The University of Washington Press, Jeffrey A. Redding explores India’s non-state system of Muslim dispute resolution—known as the dar-ul-qaza system and commonly referred to as “Muslim courts” or “sharīʿa courts”—challenges conventional narratives about the inevitable opposition between Islamic law and secular forms of governance, … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "The Speech of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman on 7th March 1971: A Historical Analysis," Islamic Law and the Muslim World eJournal (originally published in the Journal of Social and Political Sciences), Md. Shamsuddoha sheds light on how Bangabandhu Sheikh Mojibur Rahman's historic speech of 7th March 1971, which UNESCO recognized as part of the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Ana Echevarría captures changes in the field around local understandings of Mudejar as a specific Iberian category to a more comprehensive approach as one of many Muslim minorities in the Middle Ages in "Muslim minorities versus Mudejars: From the margins to the central stage of Iberian history," History Compass. In "Negotiating Mughal Law: A Family … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Shamshad Pasarlay discusses the Afghan Shīʿī communities’ position on the idea of constitutionalism and their vision for a modern constitutional state in "Shīʿī Constitutionalism in Afghanistan: A Tale of Two Draft Constitutions", Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World (originally published in the Australian Journal of Asian Law). Drawing on two draft constitutions that … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup