Does Islamic Law Support Human Cloning?

In 1983 at its Third Islamic Summit Conference, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation founded the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (“IIFA”).[1]  Based in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, the IIFA is tasked with the advancement of knowledge in the fields of culture, science, and economics.[2]  The IIFA engages in ijtihād—Islamic legal interpretation—to evaluate technological and social developments and … Continue reading Does Islamic Law Support Human Cloning?

Commentary :: Did Republican Turkey Really Abolish the Ottoman Caliphate? The Curious Case of Law No. 431

By Cem Tecimer Summary and context: In 1924, Turkey abolished the Ottoman Caliphate through a statute numbered 431, or Law No. 431. The construction of the statute was somewhat ambiguous in that it stated that the Caliphate was abolished because that institution was inherent to the State and the Republic, thus almost justifying its abolishment … Continue reading Commentary :: Did Republican Turkey Really Abolish the Ottoman Caliphate? The Curious Case of Law No. 431

Commentary :: Kadijustiz in Turkish Constitutional Adjudication: Islamic Law as an Aversive Model?

By Cem Tecimer Professor Kim Lane Scheppele has convincingly drawn attention to the fact that most legal scholarship on citations of foreign law by supreme or constitutional courts tends to focus on citations of “positive” models, that is, models to which the jurisdiction citing them aspires.[1] Professor Scheppele pluralizes the universe of citations by adding … Continue reading Commentary :: Kadijustiz in Turkish Constitutional Adjudication: Islamic Law as an Aversive Model?

Commentary :: Religious Accommodation in an Assertively Secular Legal System: Mahr and the Turkish Case

By Cem Tecimer In 1926, the young Turkish Republic abandoned its codified Islamic personal status law and replaced it with the secular Swiss Civil Code.[1] The new republican government, replacing its Ottoman predecessor, also adopted the Swiss Code of Obligations laying out the law of contracts.[2] Both of these legal transplants were part of a … Continue reading Commentary :: Religious Accommodation in an Assertively Secular Legal System: Mahr and the Turkish Case

The Islamic Festival of Sacrifice: A Temporal Difficulty?

There was a request for a preliminary ruling on Regulation No 1099/2009 by the Dutch-Language Court of First Instance in Brussels, Belgium, to the Advocate General of the EU Court of Justice. This is standard procedure whereby a question is submitted for legal ruling from which a final decision will come next. An analysis of … Continue reading The Islamic Festival of Sacrifice: A Temporal Difficulty?

Commentary :: The Myth of Voluntary Surrendering to Islamic Law: An Analysis of the Lashing of Non-Muslims Under the Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law

This commentary, by Waskito Jati, criticizes the prevailing opinion that non-Muslims who have been lashed in public after violating Islamic criminal law in Aceh have voluntarily surrendered to Islamic law after being given the choice of prosecution under Acehnese Qanun Jinayat, the Indonesian penal code. Article 5 (C) of the Qanun contradicts this opinion by stating … Continue reading Commentary :: The Myth of Voluntary Surrendering to Islamic Law: An Analysis of the Lashing of Non-Muslims Under the Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law

Commentary :: The Authority and Jurisdiction of the Acehnese Mahkamah Syar’iyah Within the Indonesian Justice System

This commentary, by Waskito Jati, discusses the formation of the new sharīʿa court (mahkamah syar’iyah) following the granting of the special region status to the province of Aceh, Indonesia, in 1999. This status gives Aceh the right to implement Islamic law in its region, including Islamic criminal law. The events following the formation of the sharīʿa … Continue reading Commentary :: The Authority and Jurisdiction of the Acehnese Mahkamah Syar’iyah Within the Indonesian Justice System

Commentary :: Arbitrariness and the Burden of Proof in New Acehnese Cases of “Moral Crimes”

This post, by Waskito Jati, examines the litigation process and sentencing regime for a new type of moral crime in Aceh: khalwat (when an unmarried man and woman are secluded). This act is criminalized under the new Acehnese Islamic Criminal Law (Aceh Qanun Jinayat No. 6 of 2014). The classification of khalwat as a moral crime … Continue reading Commentary :: Arbitrariness and the Burden of Proof in New Acehnese Cases of “Moral Crimes”

Commentary :: The Prosecution of an Unregistered Married Couple Under the Aceh Islamic Criminal Justice System

The distinction between state law and religious law remains administratively murky in many countries. Student editor Waskito Jati illustrates how a current case in Aceh, Indonesia, exemplifies the legal ambiguities. In this case, “AM and her husband RS have been accused of committing khalwat (Ar. khalwa, the act of being in a secluded place between … Continue reading Commentary :: The Prosecution of an Unregistered Married Couple Under the Aceh Islamic Criminal Justice System

Malaysian Custody Cases of Children Unilaterally Converted to Islam: Indira Gandhi Mutho v. Pathmanathan Krishnan (2016)

In this post, I examine an ongoing legal custody battle between a Hindu woman, Indira Gandhi Mutho against her former husband Pathmanathan Krishnan, who converted from Hinduism to Islam in 2009. At the heart of this battle is the fact that Krishnan, who now goes by the Muslim name Muhammad Riduan, obtained custody over the … Continue reading Malaysian Custody Cases of Children Unilaterally Converted to Islam: Indira Gandhi Mutho v. Pathmanathan Krishnan (2016)