Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Indo-Islamic Cultural Foundation's futuristic design of the new Ayodha Mosque, planned to be built on the site of the Babri Masjid that was demolished in 1992, sparked debate in the country. An amendment to Saudi Arabia's harassment law that will enable the "naming and shaming" of convicted offenders was approved by the country's cabinet.

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The pandemic has served as a catalyst for Gulf countries in their bid to adopt Western norms and policies, as declining oil prices, due to the pandemic, has underlined the need for attracting more foreign talent and investment. Russia’s Spiritual Administration of Muslims stated in a ruling that interfaith marriages between Muslim men and non-Muslim … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

In a recent statement, the Saudi Ministry of Hajj and Umrah announced that it would start receiving pilgrims from outside the country, as the Kingdom resumes its pilgrimage services in Mecca and Medina.  The Ministry announced that during the first phase of reopening it would only admit pilgrims between the ages of 18 and 50 … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Saudi Arabia, as part of its first phase of reopening, started to allow a maximum number of 6,000 pilgrims - for now only Saudi citizens and residents - to enter the Grand Mosque in Mecca for a maximum duration of three hours. The Middle East Studies Association convened a panel titled "Middle East Studies and … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Ijtihād on Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

By Nicholas Kellum This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. In 1983 at its Third Islamic Summit Conference, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation founded the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (“IIFA”).[1]  Based in Jeddah, Saudi … Continue reading Ijtihād on Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

Ijtihād on Artificial Insemination

By Nicholas Kellum This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab.  In 1983 at its Third Islamic Summit Conference, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation founded the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (“IIFA”).[1]  Based in Jeddah, Saudi … Continue reading Ijtihād on Artificial Insemination

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Saudi Arabia's Ministry of Hajj and Umrah announces that the Kingdom will impose strict limits on this year’s Hajj in order to protect the health and safety of pilgrims. Several top jurists and organizations globally back the Saudi decision to hold ‘limited’ Hajj this year due to COVID-19. The Research Group on Family and Succession … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

This Thursday, the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) unanimously held that Greece owed a Greek woman by the name of Molla Sali 51,000 euros ($57,000) in damages plus expenses “for siding with her late husband’s two sisters and for applying ‘Sharia law to a section of its citizens against their wishes.’” This judgment follows a 2018 decision by the same court in Molla … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup