Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

By Metin M. Coşgel (University of Connecticut) & Boğaç A. Ergene (University of Vermont) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar … Continue reading Pluralistic Methodologies in Islamic Legal Historiography

Contemporary Primary Sources: Kano State v. Lami Adamu: Ruling on the High Court’s Competence to Apply the Sharia Penal Code

The respondent was charged before the High Court of Kano State for the offense of homicide under the Kano State Sharia Penal Code Law 2000. Arguing that only sharīʿa courts are competent to try offenses arising under the Sharia Penal Code, the respondent challenged the jurisdiction of the High Court to hear the matter. The … Continue reading Contemporary Primary Sources: Kano State v. Lami Adamu: Ruling on the High Court’s Competence to Apply the Sharia Penal Code

Commentary: The Principle of Harmonious Interpretation and the Expansion of Federal Shariat Court Jurisdiction in Pakistan

In this post, I will examine a landmark case, Abdul Waheed v. Asma Jehangir, that was brought before the Pakistani Supreme Court and decided in 2004. The Court was asked to decide the substantive issue of whether a Muslim girl who has reached the age of puberty needs the consent of a male guardian (walī) … Continue reading Commentary: The Principle of Harmonious Interpretation and the Expansion of Federal Shariat Court Jurisdiction in Pakistan

Contemporary Primary Sources: “Shariah Law in Aceh”

This English-language summary issued by the Acehnese government (Indonesia) explains the all-encompassing role of sharīʿa in Aceh. It clarifies that sharīʿa does not apply to non-Muslims, and that its implementation in no way repudiates human rights standards, including freedom of religion. Read the document.

The Long Shadow of England’s Privy Council Cast on the Islamic Law of Trusts in British India

South Asia editor Zubair Abbasi surveys the influence of England’s Privy Council – also known as the British Judicial Committee of the Privy Council – on awqāf (Islamic endowments, or trusts). As the highest court of appeal in the British Empire, "[t]he Privy Council contributed towards the development of several legal principles in Islamic endowment law," in attempts to standardize law throughout the colonies. Its jurisprudence in turn … Continue reading The Long Shadow of England’s Privy Council Cast on the Islamic Law of Trusts in British India

CASE COMMENT: Pakistan’s Federal Shariat Court on the Protection of Women Act of 2006: Expansion of Jurisdiction, Expansion of ḥudūd

The Federal Sharia Court (FSC) of Pakistan has used Islamic criminal law (hudud) cases to expand its jurisdiction, in a move that has wide ranging effects for the adjudication of Islamic law in the country. One notable case[1] in which it sought to do so arose in a 2010 challenge to the constitutionality of the … Continue reading CASE COMMENT: Pakistan’s Federal Shariat Court on the Protection of Women Act of 2006: Expansion of Jurisdiction, Expansion of ḥudūd