Documents of Sale as Living Objects

By Athina Pfeiffer Professor Marina Rustow's note: "Having been asked twice now to contribute to the ILB, I’ve been making my way into the corpus of Islamic notarial documents preserved in Cairo Geniza. In the hope of understanding them better, I taught a PhD seminar on them in Fall 2022. Two of my students, Amel … Continue reading Documents of Sale as Living Objects

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law In "De-Europeanisation as Counter-conduct: The Case of Non-Muslim Religious Minorities in Turkey" (Romanian Journal of International Affairs 22, no. 2 (2022)), Serap Gunes (Masaryk University) "analyse[s] the dynamics through which the Turkish government seeks to uproot and reverse the Europeanisation in minority rights, and how this counter-conduct works in the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Getting to know iqrārs

By Amel Bensalim Professor Marina Rustow's note: "Having been asked twice now to contribute to the ILB, I’ve been making my way into the corpus of Islamic notarial documents preserved in Cairo Geniza. In the hope of understanding them better, I taught a PhD seminar on them in Fall 2022. Two of my students, Amel … Continue reading Getting to know iqrārs

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law In "The Probate Regime: Enchanted Bureaucracy, Islamic Law, and the Capital of Orphans in Nineteenth-Century Egypt" (Law and History Review (2022)), Adam Mestyan (Duke University) and Rezk Nori (Center for Contemporary History of Egypt) "explore the 'probate regime,' an administrative field of government activity of legally transferring, taxing, and administering … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Why I No Longer Use the Term “Qāḍī-Court Documents”

By Marina Rustow I came into my graduate seminar on Arabic legal documents with some experience in paleography and diplomatics, but vanishingly little knowledge of the material I was going to be teaching. I knew I wouldn’t always, or even often, have answers about how to read the sources, let alone how the judicial system … Continue reading Why I No Longer Use the Term “Qāḍī-Court Documents”

Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

By Marina Rustow Legal documents have survived from the medieval Islamic world in considerable quantity, but the mystery of their quotidian production and use abides. The mystery concerns personnel and physical location: Who wrote documents, and where? Where did witnesses sign them? To what extent were judges involved in their production and handling? Over the … Continue reading Are Medieval Arabic Judicial Documents as Opaque as They Look?

How to do things with translation: Translation as archives of mobility

By Iza Hussin The opening pages of KPG7514.M35 1837,[1] the text that forms the subject of the first blog entry, and texts like it, have given scholars a better sense of how law was understood in the Malay world in its moment: Bahawa Ini Kitab Undang-Undang Qanun Yang Dipakai Dalam Negeri Johor, "this is the … Continue reading How to do things with translation: Translation as archives of mobility

How to do things with translation: ‘Personal law’

By Iza Hussin Whereas the first of these posts focussed on translation between one text and another, and the second on one set of vocabularies to another, this third post considers inter-imperial translation as a source for one of the most politically productive conflations in the history of modern Islamic legal institutions: personal status/family law/Islamic … Continue reading How to do things with translation: ‘Personal law’

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS "The UN experts demanded an immediate cessation of public floggings and execution while reminding the Afghan government of the country’s standing as a state party to both the Convention against Torture and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights." "The Afghan government on Tuesday barred women from attending private … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

How to do things with translation: ‘Religion’

By Iza Hussin Having focussed in the first blog post on a Malay world text and its internal translations of concepts relating to law in Malay, Arabic, and English, this second blog post considers translative dynamics within adjudicative institutions. In the case of the Kitab Undang-Undang Qanun Yang Dipakai Dalam Negeri Johor, we focused on … Continue reading How to do things with translation: ‘Religion’