Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "International Law in General in the Medieval Islamic World" (The Cambridge History of International Law, Volume VIII: International Law in the Islamic World, Part I: International Law in the Medieval Islamic World (622-1453) (forthcoming)) Mohammad Fadel (University of Toronto) "provides the reader with an introduction to basic questions of Islamic international law as they … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The Ottoman History Podcast's series on "The Making of the Islamic World" is now available online in its entirety. The project is a ten-part series consisting of interviews with a diverse group of scholars on a number of scholarly issues, ranging from the question of "What is Islamic Law?" to "The Early Modern Islamic World." … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

On January 7-8, 2021, the Legal History Blog hosted an online conference entitled "Paper Empires: Layers of law in colonial South Asia and the Indian Ocean." Among others, Fahad Bishara (University of Virginia) presented his paper entitled "The Sailing Scribes: Legal Thinking and Praxis Across the Twentieth-Century Indian Ocean." In "The Majelis Ulama Indonesia and … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In Legal Maxims in Islamic Law: Concept, History and Application of Axioms of Juristic Accumulation (Leiden: Brill, 2021) (forthcoming), Necmettin Kizilkaya (Istanbul University) addresses the formation of Islamic law maxims "from a conceptual, historical, and implementational perspective." Rather than focusing on descriptions of maxims, Kizilkaya investigates the context and reasons behind their emergence.

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Intisar Rabb (Harvard Law School; Editor-in-Chief, Islamic Law Blog), Fahad Bishara (University of Virginia), Joel Blecher (George Washington University), Saadia Yacoob (Williams College), and Joshua White (University of Virginia) were brought together by the Ottoman History Podcast to discuss the question "What is Islamic Law?" in the first episode of a forthcoming series of podcasts … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The recording of the 4th Islamicate Digital Humanities Network (IDHN) Conference is now available online. The presents include Suphan Kirmizialtin (NYU Abu Dhabi): Handwritten-Text-Recognition for Arabic Script: A Case Study in Ottoman Turkish; Sofia Tsourlaki  (SOAS University of London): When digital forms of information become a reliable source of academic research; Ken Chitwood (Freie Universität … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Don’t Uncover that Face! COVID-19 Masks and the Niqab: Ironic Transfigurations of the ECtHR’s Intercultural Blindness" (International Journal of Semiot Law (2020)), Mario Ricca (University of Parma) investigates whether the pandemic and specifically the mask mandates implemented across Western societies, in some of which there are various cultural and legal prohibitions against Islamic attire, … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In her book review for Reading Religion (November 19, 2020) of Tamir Moustafa’s (Simon Fraser University) Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State (Cambridge University Press, 2018), Nurfadzilah Yahaya (National University of Singapore) argues that the book showcases how Islamic law is utilized by the country’s political elites “in the service of Malay … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In “Are Christians More Likely to Invoke RFRA--and win--than Other Religions since Hobby Lobby?” (Mercer Law Review, forthcoming), Stephen Cranney (Baylor University) investigates the assumption that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is successfully invoked by Christians rather than other religious minorities. Using a dataset consisting of post-Hobby Lobby cases invoking RFRA, Cranney finds that … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup