Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Don’t Uncover that Face! COVID-19 Masks and the Niqab: Ironic Transfigurations of the ECtHR’s Intercultural Blindness" (International Journal of Semiot Law (2020)), Mario Ricca (University of Parma) investigates whether the pandemic and specifically the mask mandates implemented across Western societies, in some of which there are various cultural and legal prohibitions against Islamic attire, … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In her book review for Reading Religion (November 19, 2020) of Tamir Moustafa’s (Simon Fraser University) Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State (Cambridge University Press, 2018), Nurfadzilah Yahaya (National University of Singapore) argues that the book showcases how Islamic law is utilized by the country’s political elites “in the service of Malay … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In “Are Christians More Likely to Invoke RFRA--and win--than Other Religions since Hobby Lobby?” (Mercer Law Review, forthcoming), Stephen Cranney (Baylor University) investigates the assumption that the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is successfully invoked by Christians rather than other religious minorities. Using a dataset consisting of post-Hobby Lobby cases invoking RFRA, Cranney finds that … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Quoted in an article appearing in the Wall Street Journal titled "Vienna Shooting Suspect Had Previous Terrorism Conviction," past Program in Islamic Law fellow and professor of Islamic law at Vienna University Ebrahim Afsah takes issue with state interventions across Europe to "stop the spread of Islamism." Afsah contends that European states create counterproductive results … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Michael Goodyear's (University of Michigan Law School) "Heaven or Earth: The Hagia Sophia Re-Conversion, Turkish and International Law, and Universal Religious Sites" (UCLA Journal of Islamic Law and Near Eastern Law (2021) (forthcoming)) takes a closer look at the recent Turkish court decision that enabled the reconversion of the Hagia Sophia into a mosque. While … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

The 43rd Annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture speaker Intisar Rabb's (Harvard) presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law" explains the judicial overhaul that occurred during the thirteenth century under the reign of Baibars I, Mamlūk sultan of Egypt and Syria, who established four chief judgeships representing each of the four major (Sunnī) schools of Islamic law … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a recent podcast episode of the Ajam Podcast Project titled “Rebels, Imams, and Problems of History in Early Islam,” Najam Haider discusses his new book The Rebel and the Imām in Early Islam (Cambridge University Press 2019). The podcast (and the book) shifts the focus of historical writing in early Islam from veracity, which … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Katherine Lemons’s  Divorcing traditions : Islamic marriage law and the making of Indian secularism (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2019) seeks to redefine the concept of secularism as applied in India. The author contends that secularism has assumed a different meaning than its Western counterparts, the latter often defined as separation between state and church. In … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Ioannis Glinavos's "Hagia Sophia at ICSID? The Limits of Sovereign Discretion" ((July 29, 2020), SSRN) looks at the recent conversion of the Hagia Sophia museum into a mosque (which the Islamic Law Blog extensively covered) from an international investment law angle. The author argues that there might be a violation of the bilateral investment treaty … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup