Waqfs as Moral Persons and Other Stories of Waqf Today

By Nada Moumtaz A few weeks ago, I was at a conference about Muslim philanthropy in Canada, which, gathered academics with practitioners working in the nonprofit/charitable sector, along with some who play both roles together. In a panel on waqf in Canada, the leader of a prominent organization lamented that their attempt to revive the … Continue reading Waqfs as Moral Persons and Other Stories of Waqf Today

Waqf and the Modern State, Capitalism, and the Private Property Regime

By Nada Moumtaz In the numerous small foundations that form the bulk of waqfs in Beirut in the nineteenth century, waqf, I suggested in my previous post, was the material foundation and an important means to live as a good Muslim — to get close to God, to care for one’s family as charity. Besides … Continue reading Waqf and the Modern State, Capitalism, and the Private Property Regime

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup