Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "The Application of Maqasid Al-Shari’ah in the Foreign Policy of Islamic States" (International Journal of Academic Research in Business and Social Sciences, 2021), Usman Safiyanu Duguri and others discuss the relevance of the objectives of Islamic law (maqāsid al-sharī'a) to how Muslim-majority nations formulate their foreign policies, with an added observation that maqāsid al-sharī'a … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Waqf and the Modern State, Capitalism, and the Private Property Regime

By Nada Moumtaz In the numerous small foundations that form the bulk of waqfs in Beirut in the nineteenth century, waqf, I suggested in my previous post, was the material foundation and an important means to live as a good Muslim — to get close to God, to care for one’s family as charity. Besides … Continue reading Waqf and the Modern State, Capitalism, and the Private Property Regime

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In Transformations of Tradition: Islamic Law in Colonial Modernity (Oxford University Press, 2021), Junaid Quadri (University of Illinois at Chicago), explores the various ways in which Islamic law was interpreted in innovative ways to accommodate new technologies and modernity, with a focus on a towering 20th century figure, Egyptian scholar Bakhit al-Muti'i, who all the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Scholarship as Resistance: An Interview with Wael Hallaq

This interview was conducted by Omar Abdel-Ghaffar (Harvard University, PhD student). This interview is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction.” Islamic Law Blog … Continue reading Scholarship as Resistance: An Interview with Wael Hallaq

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

On January 7-8, 2021, the Legal History Blog hosted an online conference entitled "Paper Empires: Layers of law in colonial South Asia and the Indian Ocean." Among others, Fahad Bishara (University of Virginia) presented his paper entitled "The Sailing Scribes: Legal Thinking and Praxis Across the Twentieth-Century Indian Ocean." In "The Majelis Ulama Indonesia and … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: July 3rd

SSRN's logo featuring the letters "S" "S" "R" "N" in capital letters

This week’s issue of SSRN’s Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal includes: “Muslim Nationality in Late Colonial India: From Law to Sacrifice” by Adeel Hussain By way of retracing the 1935 Shahidganj mosque dispute, this paper explores how Indian Muslims transformed their vision of community from one seeking moral legitimacy within colonial … Continue reading Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal: July 3rd

Recent Scholarship: Patriarchy and Colonialism

The latest issue of the Journal of Women's History includes the following article examining gender, race, class, and patriarchy within the British and colonial legal systems: "Class, White Women, and Elite Asian Men in British Courts during the Late Nineteenth Century" by Nurfadzilah Yahaya British imperial politics was profoundly affected by class alongside gender and … Continue reading Recent Scholarship: Patriarchy and Colonialism

Historical Primary Sources: Report of the Panel of Jurists Appointed by the Northern Region Government to Examine the Legal and Judicial Systems of the Region

On July 28, 1958, the colonial government of the Northern Region of Nigeria appointed a panel of jurists to examine the multiple systems of law existing in the region and to make recommendations for avoiding conflict among those plural systems. The multiple systems of law were English common law, British colonial statutory law, customary law, … Continue reading Historical Primary Sources: Report of the Panel of Jurists Appointed by the Northern Region Government to Examine the Legal and Judicial Systems of the Region

Commentary: The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and Islamic Endowments (Awqāf)

This article, by SHARIAsource South Asia editor Dr. Zubair Abbasi, provides an overview of the judgments of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, the highest court of appeal in the British Empire regarding Islamic Endowments (awqāf). The cases originated from all over the Muslim-populated areas of the British Empire. The first judgment was delivered … Continue reading Commentary: The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council and Islamic Endowments (Awqāf)