Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law Resources Roundup

Image of yellow text with red background, which reads "A Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law Resources"

The Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law, in the form of a Google document, is a collection of resource links and annotations to SHARIAsource and other Harvard resources, global online digital resources, and a robust “Digital Islamic Law Collection.” This week we added two exciting resources to this list: Al-Furqan’s Digital Library is a searchable … Continue reading Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law Resources Roundup

Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law Resources Roundup

The Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law, in the form of a Google document, is a collection of resource links and annotations to SHARIAsource and other Harvard resources, global online digital resources, and a robust “Digital Islamic Law Collection.” This week we added two exciting resources to this list: The Thesaurus d’epigraphic Islamique is a project led by Frederic Bauden that collects and computerizes … Continue reading Field Guide to Digital Islamic Law Resources Roundup

An Experiment in Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Islamic Law :: Part 2 ::

By Mairaj Syed Results I initially decided that I would divide up the Testimony chapter into 7-gram word fragments, because the original evidence canon consisted of seven Arabic words. This created a list of 38,683 7-gram fragments. Being ambitious and hoping to be lucky, I decided to send the google service 1000 texts at a … Continue reading An Experiment in Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Islamic Law :: Part 2 ::

An Experiment in Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Islamic Law :: Part 1 ::

  By Mairaj Syed Project Description and Goals As I briefly indicated in my previous blog post, a fundamental desideratum for the field of Islamic law and ethics is a corpus of texts whose argumentation has been fully mined: conclusions would be distinguished from premises, and the premises categorized according to type of argument. The … Continue reading An Experiment in Natural Language Processing, Machine Learning, and Islamic Law :: Part 1 ::

Maxim Romanov on “Digital Humanities for Premodern Islamic History”

In a recent post on "al-Raqmiyyāt," Maxim Romanov of the Universitätsassistent für Digital Humanities at the Institut für Geschichte offers an analysis of the overall volume of text reuse in the medieval Syrian historian Ḏhahabī’s Taʾrīkḫ al-Islām (History of Islam). In his post, Romanov notes how computational methods on digital texts allow scholars to discover connections … Continue reading Maxim Romanov on “Digital Humanities for Premodern Islamic History”

PIL Fellowship Applications for 2020-2021 [Now Closed]

The Program in Islamic Law at Harvard Law School invites applications to its 2020-2021 Fellowship Program (due Jan. 31, 2020). Research Fellowships are designed to provide an intellectual home to promising young scholars in Islamic legal studies to advance their own research and to contribute to the intellectual life of the Program and the Harvard … Continue reading PIL Fellowship Applications for 2020-2021 [Now Closed]

Getting a handle on large research projects

I am drawn to big projects. Small projects are easier to manage: if I focus on a single well–defined question, and answer it using a narrowly circumscribed set of source material, I can go from idea to article in less than a year, before my thoughts and notes and sources become too unwieldy to handle … Continue reading Getting a handle on large research projects

Dudziak Prize for Digital Legal History

Mary L. Dudziak Digital Legal History Prize, awarded for excellence in digital legal history.  The amount of the award is $250.  The deadline is September 1, 2019. The Dudziak Prize, named in honor of Mary L. Dudziak, a leading scholar of twentieth century U.S. legal history and international relations as well as a digital history pioneer, … Continue reading Dudziak Prize for Digital Legal History