Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS The East Java branch of Indonesia's largest Islamic organizations, Nahdlatul Ulama, recently announced its fatwā that forbid the use of cryptocurrency as ḥarām under Islamic law. A wedding in Afghanistan's Nangarhar province turned deadly as the Taliban reportedly shot three attendees over an argument on whether playing music was forbidden … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS After retiring from the NBA, Hakeem Olajuwon launched a successful career in real estate, all the while avoiding borrowing money for his acquisitions that would result in paying or charging interest, which contradicts his faith. Al Barakeh Wheat - a project founded by two Jordanians - teaches people how to … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Abortion and Rape Laws in Pakistan: A Sharī‘ah Based Analysis" (SSRN, September 17, 2021), Qurratul Minhas (International Islamic University, Islamabad) and Samia Maqbool Niazi (International Islamic University, Islamabad) discuss rulings on rape and abortion in classical Islamic law to point to what they consider to be gaps in current Pakistani laws dealing with the … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Adel Salman, President of the Islamic Council of Victoria (Australia), which has been running online vaccination information sessions targeted to the local Muslim community, stated that they are observing a noticeable and favorable change in the local Muslim community's eagerness to get vaccinated against COVID-19. The Association of Muslim Professionals, an NGO based in Mumbai … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Egypt's Dar al-Ifta recently issued a fatwā, announcing that the use of zakāh (almsgiving) funds to buy the coronavirus vaccine was permissible under Islamic law, as it served the higher objective of "preservation of the self." Hashem Ahmad Alshilleh, who helped to bury a generation of Muslims in Southern California in accordance with Islamic law, … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Studying a Lived Law: An Interview with Yossef Rapoport

This interview was conducted by Omar Abdel-Ghaffar (Harvard University, PhD student). This interview is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and … Continue reading Studying a Lived Law: An Interview with Yossef Rapoport

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Polymorphous Discrimination: Rohingya Women in the Goggles of Intersectionality," Islamic Law and the Muslim World eJournal, Shadrack Bentil and Edmund Poku Adu analyze the plight of Rohingya women in the Rakhine State in Myanmar using intersectionality theory, in order to identify the grounds on which Rohingya women are methodically discriminated. The paper reveals multi-faceted structural discrimination … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Scholarship in “Plain English”: Anver Emon on What We can Learn from Debates about Religious Minorities in Islamic Law

By Alicia Daniel Citation: Anver Emon, Religious Minorities and Islamic Law: Accommodation and the Limits of Tolerance, in Islamic Law and International Human Rights Law: Searching for Common Ground? 323–43 (Anver Emon, Mark Ellis, and Benjamin Glahn eds., 2012). *Note: All page numbers used as citations refer to the above chapter. Summary In medieval Islamic … Continue reading Scholarship in “Plain English”: Anver Emon on What We can Learn from Debates about Religious Minorities in Islamic Law

Wilāyat al-Faqīh and Collecting the Fifth: A Theory of Khums

By Mohammad Sagha The issue this paper seeks to address is how Ayatollāh Sayyīd Rūhullāh Khumaynī (d. 1386 sh./1989) conceptualized the collection of khums under the theory of the “Guardianship of the Jurisprudent” (wilāyat al-faqīh). The theory asserts the spiritual and practical authority of the Shīʿī jurist to govern in the absence of the twelfth … Continue reading Wilāyat al-Faqīh and Collecting the Fifth: A Theory of Khums

Authority and Khums in the Absence of the Imām: Reflections of Two Safavid-era Jurists

By Mohammad Sagha This post examines how two Ṣafavid-era jurists, Ḥussayn b. ʽAbd al-Ṣamad al-ʽĀmilī (d. 985/1577-8),[1] and Muḥammad Bāqir Majlisī (d. 1111/1698) conceptualized the authority to collect and spend the portion of khums[2]allocated for the Imām’s discretion (sahm al-Imām)[3] during the period of occultation.[4] Shīʽī legal reasoning regarding the allocation of khums is important … Continue reading Authority and Khums in the Absence of the Imām: Reflections of Two Safavid-era Jurists