Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Criticism of French President Macron, who recently described Islam as “a religion in crisis” and vowed to pass legislation in the coming weeks to allow for greater government control over mosques and their clerics, continued, as some legal scholars have contended that his statements violated both the French Constitution and international law. Others have noted … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

By Adnan Zulfiqar  This post is the third in a series of four posts on obligation, jihād, revolution and prisons. In late 2010, a Tunisian fruit seller, frustrated by restrictions on his ability to make a living and constant police harassment, poured gasoline on himself and lit a match. This was largely viewed as the … Continue reading Islamic Jurisprudence for Revolution

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Amid international outcry after a Nigerian religious court sentenced a 22-year old to death for blasphemous statements made on WhatsApp, a well-known imām (Muslim religious leader) in the country, who believes that the person should be punished, asked for a more lenient sentence. Nigerian Senator Smart Adeyemi announced his intention to advance a bill that … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Jurisdiction over Germination

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Summary Qalqashandī’s rendering in ​Ṣubḥ al-Aʿshā of an earlier decree for the appointment of a Ḥanbalī judge provides important insights into the quadripartite … Continue reading Jurisdiction over Germination