Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The rejected plan for the Muslim call to prayer to be broadcast via loudspeakers from Peterborough's (UK) mosque will be reconsidered, after it was revealed that the city council website had published a different application on its website when it announced the rejection. 14-year-old volleyball player Najah Aqeel, who had been denied from competing in … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

By Petra Sijpesteijn (Leiden University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Two … Continue reading The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

Egypt's Dar al-Ifta recently issued a fatwā, announcing that the use of zakāh (almsgiving) funds to buy the coronavirus vaccine was permissible under Islamic law, as it served the higher objective of "preservation of the self." Hashem Ahmad Alshilleh, who helped to bury a generation of Muslims in Southern California in accordance with Islamic law, … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Research on Islamic corporate social responsibility and Islamic bank disclosures" (Journal of Sustainable Finance & Investment, 2021) Ardi Gunardi (Universitas Pasundan) and colleagues examine the corporate social responsibility disclosures made in the Islamic banking and finance sector, with a focus on board structure, ownership structure, CEO power, and what they term "shariah governance." Challenging … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law from the Internal Point of View

By Haider A. Hamoudi (University of Pittsburgh) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Islamic Law from the Internal Point of View

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

As companies continue to develop vaccines against COVID-19, questions about whether these vaccines contain pork-derived ingredients continue to occupy the minds of many Muslims. Salman Waqar from the British Islamic Medical Association stated that "[t]he ḥalāl aspect of it [the Pfizer vaccine] has been noted by several scholars, from Sunnī and Shī'a backgrounds in the … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Following the beheading of Samuel Paty, a French teacher of civics, for showing caricatures of the Prophet in class during a discussion on French secularism or laicité, French teachers reported finding conversations around the issue to be increasingly difficult and volatile. Japanese Muslims expressed their frustration with the difficulty to find burial facilities and locations … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the second of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In the first post, I offered translations of three decisions and briefly explained their context. In this post, I provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. The structure of a court judgment typically … Continue reading Action Verbs and the Logic of Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In a book review titled “Isn’t the Opposite Equally True?” written for the London Review of Books, former Program in Islamic Law fellow Lawrence Rosen (Princeton University) reviews two recent publications, Laurence Louër’s Sunnis and Shi‘a: A Political History (Princeton University Press, 2020) and Kim Ghattas’s Black Wave: Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Forty-Year Rivalry … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions

By Omar Farahat This is the first of two posts that discuss sixteenth-century Egyptian Ottoman court records. In this post, I offer translations of three decisions and briefly explain their context. In the second post, I will provide some reflections on the structure of those records and its implications. This post includes translations of three … Continue reading Translations of Three Tenth/Sixteenth Century Egyptian Ottoman Court Decisions