Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

By Intisar Rabb This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in a short post, also by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Introduction* We’ve all … Continue reading Islamic Legal Canons as Memes

The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

By Petra Sijpesteijn (Leiden University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Two … Continue reading The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Innovation, Influence, and Borrowing in Mamluk-Era Legal Maxim Collections: The Case of Ibn ʿAbd al-Salām and al-Qarāfī" (Journal of the American Oriental Society 140, no. 4 (October-December 2020)), Mariam Sheibani (University of Toronto Scarborough; Lead Blog Editor) shows that the renowned Mālikī jurist al-Qarāfī's contribution to Islamic legal thought was, in part, based on … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

By Najam Haider (Barnard College) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." I should … Continue reading Future Avenues in the Study of Islamic Law

Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

By Ersilia Francesca (University of Naples “L’Orientale”) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." … Continue reading Tracing the history of Ibāḍī law and jurisprudence: A state of art

New debates about Islam in Europe

Talib Shareef, Yaya J. Fanusie, and Muhammad Fraser-Rahim, three African American Muslims with experience in a diverse array of American institutions, including the US Air Force, the CIA, and the Department of Homeland Security, respectively, recently wrote an article in Foreign Policy.  There, the authors cite and evaluate the existing narratives in circulation on Islam … Continue reading New debates about Islam in Europe

Register for the 2021 Association of American Law Schools Annual Meeting: The Power of Words

The Association of American Law Schools (AALS) will be holding its next and virtual annual meeting between January 5-9, 2021. For 2021's annual meeting, the AALS decided to offer participating schools a registration rate that allows faculty members and administrators to attend any of the meeting's sessions, which means that scholars from fee-paid AALS member … Continue reading Register for the 2021 Association of American Law Schools Annual Meeting: The Power of Words

On Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

The 43rd annual Donald A. Giannella Memorial Lecture organized by Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law hosted our Editor-in-Chief, Intisar Rabb, with her presentation titled "Interpreting Islamic Law." The presentation concerned the Mamlūk Empire during the thirteenth century, with a focus on the judicial overhaul overseen by its Sultan Baibars I. In her presentation, … Continue reading On Originalism and the Role of Legal Canons in Islamic Law

Commentary :: Ethiopia’s 1999 Federal Courts of Sharia Consolidation Proclamation: The Function of the Sharīʿa Courts

By Michael Kebede Introduction The Federal Courts of Sharia Consolidation Proclamation, enacted in 1999 by the House of People’s Representatives, reorganizes Ethiopia’s official sharīʿa courts to conform with the country’s newly established federal court system.[1] Before Ethiopia’s current regime came to power in 1991, a de jure centralized court system run by a unitary state … Continue reading Commentary :: Ethiopia’s 1999 Federal Courts of Sharia Consolidation Proclamation: The Function of the Sharīʿa Courts

European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law

Last week, the European Court of Human Rights (which examines alleged violations of the 1950 European Convention on Human Rights) handed down its long-anticipated decision in Molla Sali v. Greece, a case about Islamic legal pluralism in Europe and the rights of religious minorities. Stay tuned to the SHARIAsourceBlog for a roundtable discussion on this … Continue reading European Court of Human Rights Rules Against Forcing Greek Muslim Minority to Follow Islamic Law