Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Genres of Juristic Dialectic (ʿIlm al-Jadal wal-Khilāf)” by Dr. Walter Edward Young

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Dr. Walter Edward Young entitled “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Genres of Juristic Dialectic (ʿIlm al-Jadal wal-Khilāf) delivered on August 25, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Dr. Walter Edward Young offered the August installment … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Genres of Juristic Dialectic (ʿIlm al-Jadal wal-Khilāf)” by Dr. Walter Edward Young

Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Uṣūl al-Fiqh as a Genre” by Prof. Murteza Bedir

By Omar Khaled Abdel-Ghaffar This is a summary of the lecture by Prof. Murteza Bedir entitled “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Uṣūl al-Fiqh as a Genre” delivered on January 27, 2021 at 12 noon (EST), 6 pm (Münster) 7 pm (Istanbul) via Zoom. Professor Murteza Bedir inaugurated the monthly lectures on Islamic legal genres … Continue reading Monthly Lectures on Islamic Legal Genres: “Form, Function, and Historical Development of Uṣūl al-Fiqh as a Genre” by Prof. Murteza Bedir

Theology of Delegation and Its Impact on Islamic Legal Thought

For the month of August, we are featuring one, in-depth post by our guest editor,  Professor Hossein Modarressi, of Princeton University, and will resume our regular schedule of guest editor contributions in September with the start of the new academic year. By Hossein Modarressi* This paper aims to demonstrate how a religious worldview on the … Continue reading Theology of Delegation and Its Impact on Islamic Legal Thought

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Are the Limitations on Remedies Fair? A Comparative Study between the US Law and Islamic Law" (SSRN, May 18, 2021), Fahad Aldossary (Southern Methodist University - Dedman School of Law) discusses how US and Islamic laws situate and understand the legal concepts of "foreseeability, causation, mitigation, and certainty." In "Mapping The Common Law Concept … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya In my book, Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020), I demonstrate how colonialism embodies a contradiction; in a sense, colonial authorities limited and restricted subjects’ lives, but their authority gave rise to a sense of possibility for some colonial subjects perceived to be elite.[1] The largest … Continue reading Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In her book review of Mohammed Fadel and Connell Monette's translation of Al-Muwaṭṭaʾ, Adday Hernández (ILC-CSIS) welcomes the translation and describes it as a work that will become "one of the main reference sources" in the field of Islamic legal studies. In her undergraduate thesis entitled "I Know How the Caged Bird Tweets: Online Dissent … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Two Supercommentaries

By Mahmood Kooria The Qurra-Fatḥ was received well among the Shāfiʿī Muslims, especially in the nineteenth century—a period of multiple syntheses for Shāfiʿīsm in terms of its geographical, intellectual, and cultural realms. To highlight the ruptures in the long commentarial traditions of the school, in this last blogpost I focus on two works, both of … Continue reading Two Supercommentaries

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In Rediscovery and Revival in Islamic Environmental Law: Back to the Future of Nature's Trust (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Samira Idllalenè (Cadi Ayyad University, Marakesh) argues that commonalities across religions and different legal systems, including common law, Islamic law, and environmental law, can be employed to create better protections against climate change. In Reopening Muslim … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

An Autocommentary

By Mahmood Kooria By the sixteenth century the Muslim communities on the Indian Ocean littoral were participating intensively in Islamic intellectual networks, producing many jurists and composing many texts. They made lengthy journeys to religious educational centers such as Mecca, and this had a significant impact on the production of a huge corpus of literature … Continue reading An Autocommentary

A Commentary

By Mahmood Kooria The most renowned commentary of the Minhāj is Tuḥfat al-muḥtāj written by Ibn Ḥajar al-Haytamī (1504-1567), an Egyptian scholar who built up a successful career in Mecca. This commentary, too, represents the internal dynamics of the discursive traditions within the Shāfiʿī school as well as its historical trajectories expanding to unprecedented lands. … Continue reading A Commentary