Weekend Scholarship Roundup

SCHOLARSHIP ROUNDUP On Islamic Law: In "Navigating Colonial Law in a 'Sea of Islands'" (Law & Social Inquiry Online (December 3, 2021)), Renisa Mawani (University of British Columbia) reviews Nurfadzilah Yahaya's Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Laws and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). In "Rumi without Islam: the cultural appropriation of Rumi" (Bayt Al … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS Abel Awad, an American lawyer and Islamic law expert, stated that the viability-based reasoning behind the famous U.S. Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade, recognizing a woman's right to an abortion, imposed one religious view of viability on the American society while marginalizing other religions' view on viability, including that … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

ISLAMIC LAW IN THE NEWS In an interview with the University of Pennsylvania Carey Law School, Adnan Zulfiqar (Rutgers Law School) discussed his background and interest in Islamic law, including how that interest led him to be involved in penal code codification efforts for some Muslim-majority countries. Jacob Herzog, a Jewish Rabbi from New York, … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Can Islamic Law Principles Regarding Settlement of Criminal Disputes Solve the Problem of the US Mass Incarceration?" (SSRN,  June 23, 2021),  Amin R. Yacoub (University of Virginia School of Law) and Becky Briggs (University of San Diego) discuss the phenomenon of mass incarceration in the United States and how Islamic law principles of criminal … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Two phenomena struck me as particularly incongruous while researching for my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast and plagued me throughout the process of writing it. The first was “illegal occupations” (‘onwettige occupaties’) which referred to land occupied by populations who were not allowed to own the land according … Continue reading What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya In my book, Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020), I demonstrate how colonialism embodies a contradiction; in a sense, colonial authorities limited and restricted subjects’ lives, but their authority gave rise to a sense of possibility for some colonial subjects perceived to be elite.[1] The largest … Continue reading Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The rejected plan for the Muslim call to prayer to be broadcast via loudspeakers from Peterborough's (UK) mosque will be reconsidered, after it was revealed that the city council website had published a different application on its website when it announced the rejection. 14-year-old volleyball player Najah Aqeel, who had been denied from competing in … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

By Petra Sijpesteijn (Leiden University) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: Introduction." Two … Continue reading The continuum approach: Multiple legal solutions to run a diverse empire

Faculty-student collaboration during Covid-19

By Mona Oraby This essay is the final of three essays on Islamic law and pedagogy written by Mona Oraby. The first is “Islamic law and the liberal arts” and the second is “Why we should start with women.” Amherst College, where I teach, announced on 9 March 2020 that it would move to remote … Continue reading Faculty-student collaboration during Covid-19