Christopher S. Rose is a historian of the nineteenth and twentieth century Middle East. He earned his doctorate in History from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) in 2019. He is a postdoctoral fellow with the Institute for Historical Studies at UT for the 2019-20 year. He has taught at the University of Texas at Austin, and at neighboring St. Edward’s University.

His monograph project, tentatively titled Home Front Egypt: Famine, Disease, and Death during the Great War, describes how price control systems intended to ensure an adequate supply of food for the Egyptian population during the World War I (1914-1918) were neutralized by requisitions of labor and foodstuffs, a situation that resulted in inflation, food shortages, and starvation among civilians. Using demographic and statistical data, he argues that malnutrition facilitated the rapid spread of disease throughout the country, killing more people than military action. The ‘Spanish’ influenza pandemic alone claimed over 150,000 lives — over one percent of Egypt’s population — in the last two months of 1918 (an article about the pandemic in Egypt is forthcoming in the Journal of World History).

Dr. Rose is also active as a public historian. He founded the podcast 15 Minute History and served as co-host for eight years, and serving as immediate past-president (2018 – 2020) of the Middle East Outreach Council. His website is ChristopherSRose.com.

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