Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Indo-Islamic Cultural Foundation's futuristic design of the new Ayodha Mosque, planned to be built on the site of the Babri Masjid that was demolished in 1992, sparked debate in the country. An amendment to Saudi Arabia's harassment law that will enable the "naming and shaming" of convicted offenders was approved by the country's cabinet.

COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Image representing a virus Image credit: Wikimedia Commons

President of the Jamiat Ulama-e-Hind and Principal of Darul Uloom Deoband, Arshad Madani, among the leading Islamic scholars in India, stated that the COVID-19 vaccine is permissible under Islamic law. Raza Academy in India, an organization of Sufi Muslims, wrote to the World Health Organization, requesting information about the contents of the various vaccines against … Continue reading COVID-19 and Islamic Law Roundup

Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

By Sohaira Siddiqui (Georgetown University in Qatar) This essay is part of the Islamic Law Blog’s Roundtable on Islamic Legal History & Historiography, edited by Intisar Rabb (Editor-in-Chief) and Mariam Sheibani (Lead Blog Editor), and introduced with a list of further readings in the short post by Intisar Rabb: “Methods and Meaning in Islamic Law: … Continue reading Rethinking Dichotomies: Beyond Continuity and Rupture in Islamic Law in the Colonial Period

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Iran issued the first set of ID cards to children born to Iranian mothers and foreign fathers. In India the first arrest was made based on the newly-enacted Interfaith Marriage Law that aims to stop the so-called "love jihād" - a term highly contested and often invoked by Hindu nationalists to accuse Muslim men of … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Hum Do Hamare Do* and Sharī’a in India

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. * A common Hindi slogan indicating the desirability of a married couple limiting their progeny to two. Source Summary In Javed & Ors. v. … Continue reading Hum Do Hamare Do* and Sharī’a in India

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The pandemic has served as a catalyst for Gulf countries in their bid to adopt Western norms and policies, as declining oil prices, due to the pandemic, has underlined the need for attracting more foreign talent and investment. Russia’s Spiritual Administration of Muslims stated in a ruling that interfaith marriages between Muslim men and non-Muslim … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

The Danial Latifi Case: Shah Bano Redux

By Nikhil Goyal This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Source Summary In Danial Latifi & Anr v. Union of India, the Supreme Court of India (the “Court”) considers whether the Muslim Women Protection … Continue reading The Danial Latifi Case: Shah Bano Redux

The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

By Nathalie Gunasekera  This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. Abstract: Khursheed Ahmad Khan v. State of U.P. is a recent Indian Supreme Court case. Khursheed Ahmad Khan (appellant), a Muslim civil servant, married … Continue reading The Supreme Court of India Weighs in on Muslim Personal Law

Shifting Religious Landscapes: From Istanbul to Ayodhya

By Abtsam Saleh This post is part of the Digital Islamic Law Lab (DILL) series, in which a Harvard student analyzes a primary source of Islamic law, previously workshopped in the DIL Lab. On 9 November 2019, the Supreme Court of India declared the final judgement in the case regarding disputed land in the Ayodhya region in … Continue reading Shifting Religious Landscapes: From Istanbul to Ayodhya

A Few Concluding Remarks on Anglo-Muhammadan Law

This is part 6 and the final post of a six-part series of posts that will examine Anglo-Muhammadan law in the courts of British India. Due to the generally unexplored nature of Anglo-Muhammadan law, I want to conclude my series of blogs with some notes that pinpoint some particular aspects of it that I believe … Continue reading A Few Concluding Remarks on Anglo-Muhammadan Law