Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

By Mehdi Berriah This is part two in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. First Episode The first episode took place in dhū-l-qaʿda 657/November 1259, after Quṭuz dismissed al-Manṣūr ʿAlī, the son of his former master, the first Mamlūk sultan al-Muʿizz Aybak (d. 655/1257), and proclaimed himself sultan. The … Continue reading Episodes in which the ʿUlamāʾ, according to Islamic Law, were Opposed to the Tax

The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

By Mehdi Berriah This is part one in a series of four posts on the financing of jihād during the Mamlūk period. While the spirit and laws of jihād have often attracted the attention of researchers, this is not the case for its economic aspect, which remains poorly known. It must be kept in mind … Continue reading The Issue of Financing Jihād in Islamic Law: Three Case Studies from the Mamlūk Period

Welcome to our September Guest Blogger: Mehdi Berriah

Dr. Mehdi Berriah is Assistant Professor of Classical Arabic and Islamic Studies at the Faculty of Religion and Theology of the Vrije Universiteit (VU) Amsterdam. He is a member of the Centre for Islamic Theology (CIT) at VU Amsterdam. He also teaches Modern Standard Arabic at Sciences Po Paris University. Before joining VU Amsterdam, Mehdi … Continue reading Welcome to our September Guest Blogger: Mehdi Berriah

Theology of Delegation and Its Impact on Islamic Legal Thought

For the month of August, we are featuring one, in-depth post by our guest editor,  Professor Hossein Modarressi, of Princeton University, and will resume our regular schedule of guest editor contributions in September with the start of the new academic year. By Hossein Modarressi* This paper aims to demonstrate how a religious worldview on the … Continue reading Theology of Delegation and Its Impact on Islamic Legal Thought

Welcome to our August Guest Blogger: Hossein Modarressi

Hossein Modarressi is the Bayard Dodge Professor of Near Eastern Studies and Professor of Islamic Law at Princeton University where he has taught since 1983. He attended the Islamic seminary at Qom (Iran) where he received a complete traditional Islamic education in Islamic philosophy, theology and law, ending with a certificate of ijtihād. He also … Continue reading Welcome to our August Guest Blogger: Hossein Modarressi

Thank you, Nurfadzilah Yahaya!

Thank you, Nurfadzilah Yahaya, for joining us as guest blog editor throughout July. In case you missed any of her blog posts, here they are: Ṭalāq in the Colonies – Constraints on Colonial Judiciary What does Equality Mean in the Colonies? Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers … Continue reading Thank you, Nurfadzilah Yahaya!

Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Powers of attorney form the basis of the second chapter of my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020). The digital collection of these documents produced by the Arab communities in the Straits Settlements (mostly Singapore) in the Koh Seow Chuan Collection in the National … Continue reading Portals to the Future: Translations of Powers of Attorney

Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya My book  Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast Asia (Cornell University Press, 2020) traces changing notions of family and clan across legal cultures in the realm of family law. Supposedly, Islamic law does not enter the secular sphere of politics during the colonial period. Yet, although dissipation of political power … Continue reading Family Law as Colonial Specter of Shelter

What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?

By Nurfadzilah Yahaya Two phenomena struck me as particularly incongruous while researching for my book Fluid Jurisdictions: Colonial Law and Arabs in Southeast and plagued me throughout the process of writing it. The first was “illegal occupations” (‘onwettige occupaties’) which referred to land occupied by populations who were not allowed to own the land according … Continue reading What does Equality Mean in the Colonies?