July DILL Student Analyses :: Nicholas Kellum

The Islamic Law Blog is continuing to feature Harvard student comments on primary sources related to Islamic law. Our student editor for the month of July is Nicholas, a second-year JD student at Harvard Law School. Each month, we feature a series of three comments written by a student in the Digital Islamic Law Lab … Continue reading July DILL Student Analyses :: Nicholas Kellum

Islamic Law in the News Roundup

  Damilola S. Olawuyi, Associate Professor at the College of Law  at Hamad Bin Khalifa University,  explores Islamic alternative dispute resolution methods: can they provide an alternative legal framework for resolving non-commercial disputes such as those that arise in family disputes, property, and inheritance? Friday, a Court  in Abuja, Nigeria dissolved a 32-year-old marriage on … Continue reading Islamic Law in the News Roundup

Welcome to our July Guest Blogger: Sohaira Siddiqui

It is our pleasure to welcome Sohaira Siddiqui as our July guest blog editor.  Sohaira Siddiqui is an Associate Professor of Theology at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service in Qatar. Her work focuses on the relationship between law, theology and political thought in classical Islam; Islamic law during British colonization; Islamic law in contemporary … Continue reading Welcome to our July Guest Blogger: Sohaira Siddiqui

Thank you, Ahmad Ahmad!

Thank you Ahmad A. Ahmad for joining us as the guest blog editor throughout the month of June. In case you missed any of his blog posts here they are: From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure From Punishment to Restitution: … Continue reading Thank you, Ahmad Ahmad!

From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure

This is part 1 in a series of 4 posts. :: Part 1 :: After the Failure You are the kind of legal scholar who has no patience for trying tactics that lead into predictable problems. You take for granted that criminal acts (as reflection of a criminal capacity) are simply part of human nature, … Continue reading From Punishment to Restitution: In What Direction Should a Restatement of Islamic Law Go? :: Part 1 :: After the Failure

June DILL Student Analyses :: Limeng Sun

The Islamic Law Blog is continuing to feature Harvard student comments on primary sources related to Islamic law. Our student editor for the month of June is Limeng, a second-year JD student at Harvard Law School. Each month, we feature a series of three comments written by a student in the Digital Islamic Law Lab … Continue reading June DILL Student Analyses :: Limeng Sun

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Leor Halevi's Modern Things on Trial: Islam's Global and Material Reformation in the Age of Rida 1865-1935, Columbia University Press 2019, wins the J. Willard Hurst Book Prize. In "Ideology, Communication, and Response to Terrorism: A Sharia-based Perspective," Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World eJournal (originally published in the International Journal of Academic … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

In "Polymorphous Discrimination: Rohingya Women in the Goggles of Intersectionality," Islamic Law and the Muslim World eJournal, Shadrack Bentil and Edmund Poku Adu analyze the plight of Rohingya women in the Rakhine State in Myanmar using intersectionality theory, in order to identify the grounds on which Rohingya women are methodically discriminated. The paper reveals multi-faceted structural discrimination … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Elizabeth Urban explores the ways in which new Muslims of slave origins were integrated into early Islamic society in "Conquered Populations in Early Islam; Non-Arabs, Slaves and the Sons of Slave Mothers," Edinburgh University Press. The book focuses on Muslims of slave origins, who belonged to the society in which they lived but whose slave … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Weekend Scholarship Roundup

Shamshad Pasarlay discusses the Afghan Shīʿī communities’ position on the idea of constitutionalism and their vision for a modern constitutional state in "Shīʿī Constitutionalism in Afghanistan: A Tale of Two Draft Constitutions", Islamic Law & Law of the Muslim World (originally published in the Australian Journal of Asian Law). Drawing on two draft constitutions that … Continue reading Weekend Scholarship Roundup